RSE Scheme

RSE scheme

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Autumn 1 Autumn 2
 Me and My Relationships  Valuing Difference
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Talk about similarities and differences.
  • Name special people in their lives.
    Describe different feelings.
  • Identify who can help if they are sad, worried or scared.
  • Identify ways to help others or themselves if they are sad or worried.
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Be sensitive towards others and celebrate what makes each person unique.
  • Recognise that we can have things in common with others.
  • Use speaking and listening skills to learn about the lives of their peers.
  • Know the importance of showing care and kindness towards others.
  • Demonstrate skills in building friendships and cooperation.
FS2 1. All about me

  • Talk about their own interests.
  • Talk about their families.
  • Talk about how they are the same or different to others.

2. What makes me special

  • Share their favourite interests and objects.
  • Talk about themselves positively.
  • Listen to what others say and respond.

3. Me and my special people

  • Talk about the important people in their lives.
  • Understand that we have different special people.
  • Name key people outside of families that care for them.

4. Who can help me?

  • Talk about when they might feel unsafe or unhappy.
  • Name the people who will help them.
  • Notice when a friend is in need at school and help them.

5. My feelings

  • Describe different emotions.
  • Explore how we feel at certain times or events.
  • Identify ways to change feelings and calm down.

6. My feelings (2)

  • Identify events that can make a person feel sad.
  • Suggest ways in which they can help a friend who is sad.
  • Choose ways to help themselves when they feel sad.

 

1. I’m special, you’re special

  • Describe their own positive attributes.
  • Share their likes and dislikes.
  • Listen to and respect the ideas of others.

2. Same and different

  • Recognise the similarities and differences amongst their peers.
  • Discuss why differences should be celebrated.
  • Retell a story.

3. Same and different families

  • Talk about their family, customs and traditions.
  • Listen to others talk about their experiences.
  • Compare their own experiences with those of others.

4. Same and different homes

  • Recognise the similarities and differences between their home and those of others.
  • Talk about what makes their home feel special and safe.
  • Be sensitive towards others.

5. Kind and caring (1)

  • Suggest ways in which we can be kind towards others.
  • Demonstrate skills in cooperation with others.

6. Kind and caring (2)

  • Show friendly behaviour towards a peer.
  • Build relationships with others.
Y1 1.Why we have classroom rules

  • Understand that classroom rules help everyone to learn and be safe;
  • Explain their classroom rules and be able to contribute to making these.

2. Thinking about feelings

  • Recognise how others might be feeling by reading body language/facial expressions;
  • Understand and explain how our emotions can give a physical reaction in our body (e.g. butterflies in the tummy etc.)

3. Our feelings

  • Identify a range of feelings;
  • Identify how feelings might make us behave:
  • Suggest strategies for someone experiencing ‘not so good’ feelings to manage these.

4. Feelings and bodies

  • Recognise that people’s bodies and feelings can be hurt;
  • Suggest ways of dealing with different kinds of hurt.

5. Our special people balloons

  • Recognise that they belong to various groups and communities such as their family;
  • Explain how these people help us and we can also help them to help us.

6. Good friends

  • Identify simple qualities of friendship;
  • Suggest simple strategies for making up.

7. How are you listening

  • Demonstrate attentive listening skills;
  • Suggest simple strategies for resolving conflict situations;
  • Give and receive positive feedback, and experience how this makes them feel.

 

1. Same or different?

  • Identify the differences and similarities between people;
  • Empathise with those who are different from them;
  • Begin to appreciate the positive aspects of these differences.

2. Unkind, tease or bully?

  • Explain the difference between unkindness, teasing and bullying;
  • Understand that bullying is usually quite rare.

3. Harold’s school rules

  • Explain some of their school rules and how those rules help to keep everybody safe.

4. Who are our special people?

  • Identify some of the people who are special to them;
  • Recognise and name some of the qualities that make a person special to them.

5. It’s not fair!

  • Recognise and explain what is fair and unfair, kind and unkind;
  • Suggest ways they can show kindness to others.
Y2 1.Our ideal classroom (1)

  • Suggest actions that will contribute positively to the life of the classroom;
  • Make and undertake pledges based on those actions.

2. Our ideal classroom (2)

  • Take part in creating and agreeing classroom rules.

3. How are you feelings today?

  • Use a range of words to describe feelings;
  • Recognise that people have different ways of expressing their feelings;
  • Identify helpful ways of responding to other’s feelings.

4. Bullying or teasing?

  • Define what is meant by the terms ‘bullying’ and ‘teasing’ showing an understanding of the difference between the two;
  • Identify situations as to whether they are incidents of teasing or bullying.

5. Don’t do that!

  • Understand and describe strategies for dealing with bullying:
  • Rehearse and demonstrate some of these strategies.

6. Types of bullying

  • Explain the difference between bullying and isolated unkind behaviour;
  • Recognise that that there are different types of bullying and unkind behaviour;
  • Understand that bullying and unkind behaviour are both unacceptable ways of behaving.

7. Being a good friend

  • Recognise that friendship is a special kind of relationship;
  • Identify some of the ways that good friends care for each other.

8. Let’s all be happy!

  • Recognise, name and understand how to deal with feelings (e.g. anger, loneliness);
  • Explain where someone could get help if they were being upset by someone else’s behaviour.
1. What makes us who we are?

  • Identify some of the physical and non-physical differences and similarities between people;
  • Know and use words and phrases that show respect for other people.

2. How do we make others feel?

  • Recognise and explain how a person’s behaviour can affect other people.

3. My special people

  • Identify people who are special to them;
  • Explain some of the ways those people are special to them.

4. When someone is feeling left out

  • Explain how it feels to be part of a group;
  • Explain how it feels to be left out from a group;
  • Identify groups they are part of;
  • Suggest and use strategies for helping someone who is feeling left out.

5. An act of kindness

  • Recognise and describe acts of kindness and unkindness;
  • Explain how these impact on other people’s feelings;
  • Suggest kind words and actions they can show to others;
  • Show acts of kindness to others in school.

6. Solve the problem

  • Demonstrate active listening techniques (making eye contact, nodding head, making positive noises, not being distracted);
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with a range of common situations requiring negotiation skills to help foster and maintain positive relationships.
Y3 1. As a rule

  • Explain why we have rules;
  • Explore why rules are different for different age groups, in particular for internet-based activities;
  • Suggest appropriate rules for a range of settings;
  • Consider the possible consequences of breaking the rules.

2. My special pet

  • -Explain some of the feelings someone might have when they lose something important to them;
  • -Understand that these feelings are normal and a way of dealing with the situation.

3. Tangram team challenge

  • -Define and demonstrate cooperation and collaboration;
  • -Identify the different skills that people can bring to a group task;
  • -Demonstrate how working together in a collaborative manner can help everyone to achieve success.

4. Looking after our special people

  • -Identify people who they have a special relationship with;
  • -Suggest strategies for maintaining a positive relationship with their special people.

5. How can we solve this problem

  • -Does it matter if not everyone agrees?
  • -What if someone feels very strongly about something?

6. Dan’s dare

  • -Explain what a dare is;
  • -Understand that no-one has the right to force them to do a dare;
  • -Suggest strategies to use if they are ever made to feel uncomfortable or unsafe by someone asking them to do a dare.

7. Thunks

  • -Express opinions and listen to those of others;
  • -Consider others’ points of view;
  • -Practise explaining the thinking behind their ideas and opinions.

8. Friends are special

  • -Identify qualities of friendship;
  • -Suggest reasons why friends sometimes fall out;
  • -Rehearse and use, now or in the future, skills for making up again.
1. Family and friends

  • Recognise that there are many different types of family;
  • Understand what is meant by ‘adoption’ ‘fostering’ and ‘same-sex relationships.’

2. My community

  • Define the term ‘community’;
  • Identify the different communities that they belong to;
  • Recognise the benefits that come with belonging to a community, in particular the benefit to mental health and wellbeing.

3. Respect and challenge

  • Reflect on listening skills;
  • Give examples of respectful language;
  • Give examples of how to challenge another’s viewpoint, respectfully.

4. Friends and neighbours

  • Explain that people living in the UK have different origins;
  • Identify similarities and differences between a diverse range of people from varying national, regional, ethnic and religious backgrounds;
  • Identity some of the qualities that people from a diverse range of backgrounds need in order to get on together.

5. Let’s celebrate our differences

  • Recognise the factors that make people similar to and different from each other;
  • Recognise that repeated name calling is a form of bullying;
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with name calling (including talking to a trusted adult).

6. Zeb

  • Understand and explain some of the reasons why different people are bullied;
  • Explore why people have prejudiced views and understand what this is.
Y4 1. An email from Harold!

  • Describe ‘good’ and ‘not so good’ feelings and how feelings can affect our physical state;
  • Explain how different words can express the intensity of feelings.

2. OK or not OK? (part 1)

  • Explain what we mean by a ‘positive, healthy relationship’;
  • Describe some of the qualities that they admire in others.

3. OK or not OK? (part 2)

  • Recognise that there are times when they might need to say ‘no’ to a friend;
  • Describe appropriate assertive strategies for saying ‘no’ to a friend.

4. Human machines

  • Demonstrate strategies for working on a collaborative task;
  • Define successful qualities of teamwork and collaboration.

5. Different feelings

  • Identify a wide range of feelings;
  • Recognise that different people can have different feelings in the same situation;
  • Explain how feelings can be linked to physical state.

6. When feelings change

  • Demonstrate a range of feelings through their facial expressions and body language;
  • Recognise that their feelings might change towards someone or something once they have further information.

7. Under pressure

  • Give examples of strategies to respond to being bullied, including what people can do and say;
  • Understand and give examples of who or where pressure to behave in an unhealthy, unacceptable or risky way might come from.
1. Can you sort it

  • Define the terms ‘negotiation’ and ‘compromise’;
  • Understand the need to manage conflict or differences and suggest ways of doing this, through negotiation and compromise.

2. Islands

  • Understand that they have the right to protect their personal body space;
  • Recognise how others’ non-verbal signals indicate how they feel when people are close to their body space;
  • Suggest people they can talk to if they feel uncomfortable with other people’s actions towards them.

3. Friend or acquaintance?

  • Recognise that they have different types of relationships with people they know (e.g. close family, wider family, friends, acquaintances);
  • Give examples of features of these different types of relationships, including how they influence what is shared.

4. What would I do?

  • List some of the ways that people are different to each other (including differences of race, gender, religion);
  • Recognise potential consequences of  aggressive behaviour;
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with someone who is behaving aggressively.

5. The people we share our world with

  • List some of the ways in which people are different to each other (including ethnicity, gender, religious beliefs, customs and festivals);
  • Define the word respect and demonstrate ways of showing respect to others’ differences.

6. That is such a stereotype!

  • Understand and identify stereotypes, including those promoted in the media.
Y5 1. Collaboration Challenge!

  • Explain what collaboration means;
  • Give examples of how they have worked collaboratively;
  • Describe the attributes needed to work collaboratively.

2. Give and take

  • Explain what is meant by the terms negotiation and compromise;
  • Describe strategies for resolving difficult issues or situations.

3. How good a friend are you?

  • Demonstrate how to respond to a wide range of feelings in others;
  • Give examples of some key qualities of friendship;
  • Reflect on their own friendship qualities.

4. Relationship cake recipe

  • Identify what things make a relationship unhealthy;
  • Identify who they could talk to if they needed help.

5. Being assertive

  • Identify characteristics of passive, aggressive and assertive behaviours;
  • Understand and rehearse assertiveness skills.

6. Our emotional needs

  • Recognise basic emotional needs, understand that they change according to circumstance;
  • Identify risk factors in a given situation (involving smoking or other scenarios) and consider outcomes of risk taking in this situation, including emotional risks.

7. Communication

  • Understand that online communication can be misinterpreted;
  • Accept that responsible and respectful behaviour is necessary when interacting with others online as well as face-to-face.
1. Quality of friendships

  • Define some key qualities of friendship;
  • Describe ways of making a friendship last;
  • Explain why friendships sometimes end.

2. Kind conversations

  • Rehearse active listening skills:
  • Demonstrate respectfulness in responding to others;
  • Respond appropriately to others.

3. Happy being me

  • Develop an understanding of discrimination and its injustice, and describe this using examples;
  • Empathise with people who have been, and currently are, subjected to injustice, including through racism;
  • Consider how discriminatory behaviour can be challenged.

4. Is it true?

  • Understand that the information we see online, either text or images, is not always true or accurate;
  • Recognise that some people post things online about themselves that aren’t true, sometimes this is so that people will like them;
  • Understand and explain the difference between sex, gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation.

5. It could happen to anyone

  • Identify the consequences of positive and negative behaviour on themselves and others;
  • Give examples of how individual/group actions can impact on others in a positive or negative way.
Y6 1. Working together

  • Demonstrate a collaborative approach to a task;
  • Describe and implement the skills needed to do this.

2. Let’s negotiate

  • Explain what is meant by the terms ‘negotiation’ and ‘compromise’;
  • Suggest positive strategies for negotiating and compromising within a collaborative task;
  • Demonstrate positive strategies for negotiating and compromising within a collaborative task.

3. Solving the friendship problem

  • Recognise some of the challenges that arise from friendships;
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with such challenges demonstrating the need for respect and an assertive approach.

4. Assertiveness skills

  • List some assertive behaviours;
  • Recognise peer influence and pressure;
  • Demonstrate using some assertive behaviours, through role-play, to resist peer influence and pressure.

5. Behave yourself

  • Recognise and empathise with patterns of behaviour in peer-group dynamics;
  • Recognise basic emotional needs and understand that they change according to circumstance;
  • Suggest strategies for dealing assertively with a situation where someone under pressure may do something they feel uncomfortable about.

6. Dan’s Day

  • Describe the consequences of reacting to others in a positive or negative way;
  • Suggest ways that people can respond more positively to others.

7. Don’t force me

  • Describe ways in which people show their commitment to each other;
  • Know the ages at which a person can marry, depending on whether their parents agree;
  • Understand that everyone has the right to be free to choose who and whether to marry.

8. Acting appropriately

  • Recognise that some types of physical contact can produce strong negative feelings;
  • Know that some inappropriate touch is also illegal.

9. It’s a puzzle

  • Identify strategies for keeping personal information safe online;
  • Describe safe and respectful behaviours when using communication technology.

 

1. OK to be different

  • Recognise that bullying and discriminatory behaviour can result from disrespect of people’s differences;
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with bullying, as a bystander;
  • Describe positive attributes of their peers.

2. We have more in common than not

  • Know that all people are unique but that we have far more in common with each other than what is different about us;
  • Consider how a bystander can respond to someone being rude, offensive or bullying someone else;
  • Demonstrate ways of offering support to someone who has been bullied.

3. Respecting differences

  • Demonstrate ways of showing respect to others, using verbal and non-verbal communication.

4. Tolerance and respect for others

  • Understand and explain the term prejudice;
  • Identify and describe the different groups that make up their school/wider community/other parts of the UK;
  • Describe the benefits of living in a diverse society;
  • Explain the importance of mutual respect for different faiths and beliefs and how we demonstrate this.

5. Advertising friendships!

  • Explain the difference between a friend and an acquaintance;
  • Describe qualities of a strong, positive friendship;
  • Describe the benefits of other types of relationship (e.g. neighbour, parent/carer, relative).

6. Boys will be boys? – challenging gender stereotypes

  • Define what is meant by the term stereotype;
  • Recognise how the media can sometimes reinforce gender stereotypes;
  • Recognise that people fall into a wide range of what is seen as normal;
  • Challenge stereotypical gender portrayals of people.

 

Spring 1 Spring 2
Keeping Myself Safe Rights and Responsibilities
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Talk about how to keep their bodies healthy and safe.
  • Name ways to stay safe around medicines.
  • Know how to stay safe in their home, classroom and outside.
  • Know age-appropriate ways to stay safe online.
  • Name adults in their lives and those in their community who keep them safe.
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Understand that they can make a difference.
  • Identify how they can care for their home, school and special people.
  • Talk about how they can make an impact on the natural world.
  • Talk about similarities and differences between themselves.
  • Demonstrate building relationships with friends.
FS2
  1. What’s safe to go on to my body
  • Name things that keep their bodies safe.
  • Name things that keep their bodies clean and protected.
  • Think about how to recognise things that might not be safe.
  1. Keeping myself safe
  •  What’s safe to go into my body (including medicines)
  • Make safe decisions about items they don’t recognise.
  • Talk about what our bodies need to stay well.
  • Name the safe ways to store medicine and who can give it to children (adults).
  1. Safe indoors and outdoors
  • Name some hazards and ways to stay safe inside.
  • Name some hazards and ways to stay safe outside.
  • Show how to care for the safety of others.
  1. Listen to my feelings (1)
  • Name the adults who they can ask for help from, and will keep them safe.
  • Recognise the feelings they have when they are unsafe.
  • Talk about keeping themselves safe, safe touches and consent.
  1. Keeping safe online
  • Share ideas about activities that are safe to do on electronic devices.
  • What to do and who to talk to if they feel unsafe online.
  1. People who help to keep me safe
  • Name the people in their lives who help to keep them safe.
  • Name people in their community who help to keep them safe.
  • Talk about ways to keep themselves safe in their environment.

 

  1. Looking after my special people
  • Name the special people in their lives.
  • Understand that our special people can be different to those of others.
  1. Looking after my friends
  • Talk about why friends are important and how they help us.
  • Identify ways to care for a friend in need.
  • Identify ways to help others in their community.
  1. Being helpful at home and caring for our classroom
  • Identify ways in which they help at home.
  • Recognise the importance of taking care of a shared environment.
  • Name ways in which they can look after their learning environment.
  1. Caring for our world
  • Think about what makes the world special and beautiful.
  • Name ways in which they can help take care of the environment, e.g. recycling, saving energy, wasting less.
  • Talk about what can happen to living things if the world is not cared for.
  1. Looking after money (1): recognising, spending, using
  • Recognise coins and other items relating to money.
  • Identify the uses of money.
  1. Looking after money (2): saving money and keeping it safe
  • Talk about why it’s important to keep money safe.
  • Identify ways to save money.
  • Talk about why we save money.
Y1

1. Healthy me

  • Understand that they have the right to say “no” to unwanted touch;-Start thinking about who they trust and who they can ask for help.
  1. Super sleep
  • Recognise the importance of sleep in maintaining a healthy, balanced lifestyle;
  • Identify simple bedtime routines that promote healthy sleep.
  1. Who can help? (1)
  • Recognise emotions and physical feelings associated with feeling unsafe;
  • Identify people who can help them when they feel unsafe.
  1. Harold loses Geoffrey
  • Recognise the range of feelings that are associated with loss.
  1. What could Harold do?
  • Understand that medicines can sometimes make people feel better when they’re ill;
  • Explain simple issues of safety and responsibility about medicines and their use.
  1. Good or bad touches?
  • Understand and learn the PANTS rules;
  • Name and know which parts should be private;
  • Explain the difference between appropriate and inappropriate touch;
  • Understand that they have the right to say “no” to unwanted touch;
  • Start thinking about who they trust and who they can ask for help.

 

  1. Harold’s wash and brush up
  • Recognise the importance of regular hygiene routines;
  • Sequence personal hygiene routines into a logical order.
  1. Around and about the school
  • Identify what they like about the school environment;
  • Recognise who cares for and looks after the school environment.
  1. Taking care of something
  • Demonstrate responsibility in looking after something (e.g. a class pet or plant);
  • Explain the importance of looking after things that belong to themselves or to others.
  1. Harold’s money
  • Explain where people get money from;
  • List some of the things that money may be spent on in a family home.
  1. How should we look after our money?
  • Recognise that different notes and coins have different monetary value;
  • Explain the importance of keeping money safe;
  • Identify safe places to keep money;
  • -Understand the concept of ‘saving money’ (i.e. by keeping it in a safe placed and adding to it).
  1. Basic first aid
Y2
  1. Harold’s picnic
  • Understand that medicines can sometimes make people feel better when they’re ill;
  • Give examples of some of the things that a person can do to feel better without use of medicines, if they are unwell;
  • Explain simple issues of safety and responsibility about medicines and their use.
  • How safe would you feel?
  • Identify situations in which they would feel safe or unsafe;
  • Suggest actions for dealing with unsafe situations including who they could ask for help.

2. How safe would you feel?

  • Identify situations in which they would feel safe or unsafe;
  • Suggest actions for dealing with unsafe situations including who they could ask for help.
  1. What would Harold say?
  • Identify situations in which they would need to say ‘Yes’, ‘No’, ‘I’ll ask’, or ‘I’ll tell’, in relation to keeping themselves and others safe.
  1. I don’t like that!
  • Recognise that body language and facial expression can give clues as to how comfortable and safe someone feels in a situation;
  • Identify the types of touch they like and do not like;
  • Identify who they can talk to if someone touches them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.
  1. Fun or not?
  • Recognise that some touches are not fun and can hurt or be upsetting;
  • Know that they can ask someone to stop touching them;
  • Identify who they can talk to if someone touches them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.
  1. Should I tell?
  • Identify safe secrets (including surprises) and unsafe secrets;
  • Recognise the importance of telling someone they trust about a secret which makes them feel unsafe or uncomfortable.

1. Getting on with others

  • Describe and record strategies for getting on with others in the classroom.
  1. When I feel like erupting
  • Explain, and be able to use, strategies for dealing with impulsive behaviour.
  1. Feeling safe
  • Identify special people in the school and community who can help to keep them safe;
  • Know how to ask for help.
  1. How can we look after our environment?
  • Identify what they like about the school environment;
  • Identify any problems with the school environment (e.g. things needing repair);
  • Make suggestions for improving the school environment;
  • Recognise that they all have a responsibility for helping to look after the school environment.
  1. Harold saves something special
  • Understand that people have choices about what they do with their money;
  • Know that money can be saved for a use at a future time;
  • Explain how they might feel when they spend money on different things.
  1. Harold goes camping
  • Recognise that money can be spent on items which are essential or non-essential;
  • Know that money can be saved for a future time and understand the reasons why people (including themselves) might do this.

7. Playing games

Y3
  1. Safe or unsafe?
  • Identify situations which are safe or unsafe;
  • Identify people who can help if a situation is unsafe;
  • Suggest strategies for keeping safe.
  1. Danger or risk?
  • Define the words danger and risk and explain the difference between the two;
  • Demonstrate strategies for dealing with a risky situation.
  1. The Risk Robot
  • Identify risk factors in given situations;
  • Suggest ways of reducing or managing those risks.
  1. Alcohol and cigarettes: the facts
  • Identify some key risks from and effects of cigarettes and alcohol;
  • Know that most people choose not to smoke cigarettes; (Social Norms message)
  • Define the word ‘drug’ and understand that nicotine and alcohol are both drugs.
  1. Super Searcher
  • Evaluate the validity of statements relating to online safety;
  • Recognise potential risks associated with browsing online;
  • Give examples of strategies for safe browsing online.
  1. None of your business
  • Know that our body can often give us a sign when something doesn’t feel right; to trust these signs and talk to a trusted adult if this happens;
  • Recognise and describe appropriate behaviour online as well as offline;
  • Identify what constitutes personal information and when it is not appropriate or safe to share this;
  • Understand and explain how to get help in a situation where requests for images or information of themselves or others occurs.
  1. Raisin challenge (1)
  • Demonstrate strategies for assessing risks;
  • Understand and explain decision-making skills;
  • Understand where to get help from when making decisions.
  1. Help or harm?
  • Understand that medicines are drugs and suggest ways that they can be helpful or harmful.

 

  1. Our helpful volunteers
  • Define what a volunteer is;
  • Identify people who are volunteers in the school community;
  • Recognise some of the reasons why people volunteer, including mental health and wellbeing benefits to those who volunteer.

2. Helping each other to stay safe

  • Identify key people who are responsible for them to stay safe and healthy;
  • Suggest ways they can help these people.
  1. Recount task
  • Understand the difference between ‘fact’ and ‘opinion’;
  • Understand how an event can be perceived from different viewpoints;
  • Plan, draft and publish a recount using the appropriate language.
  1. Harold’s environment project
  • Define what is meant by the environment;
  • Evaluate and explain different methods of looking after the school environment;
  • Devise methods of promoting their priority method.
  1. Can Harold afford it?
  • Understand the terms ‘income’, ‘saving’ and ‘spending’;
  • Recognise that there are times we can buy items we want and times when we need to save for items;
  • Suggest items and services around the home that need to be paid for (e.g. food, furniture, electricity etc.)
  1. Earning money
  • Explain that people earn their income through their jobs;
  • Understand that the amount people get paid is due to a range of factors (skill, experience, training, responsibility etc.)
Y4
  1. Danger, risk or hazard?
  • Define the terms ‘danger’, ‘risk’ and ‘hazard’ and explain the difference between them;
  • Identify situations which are either dangerous, risky or hazardous;
  • Suggest simple strategies for managing risk.
  1. Picture Wise
  • Identify images that are safe/unsafe to share online;
  • Know and explain strategies for safe online sharing;
  • Understand and explain the implications of sharing images online without consent.
  1. How dare you!
  • Define what is meant by the word ‘dare’;
  • Identify from given scenarios which are dares and which are not;
  • Suggest strategies for managing dares.
  1. Medicines: check the label
  • Understand that medicines are drugs;
  • Explain safety issues for medicine use;
  • Suggest alternatives to taking a medicine when unwell;
  • Suggest strategies for limiting the spread of infectious diseases (e.g. hand-washing routines).
  1. Know the norms
  • Understand some of the key risks and effects of smoking and drinking alcohol;
  • Understand that increasing numbers of young people are choosing not to smoke and that not all people drink alcohol (Social Norms theory).
  1. Keeping ourselves safe
  • Describe stages of identifying and managing risk;
  • Suggest people they can ask for help in managing risk.
  1. Raisin challenge
  • Understand that we can be influenced both positively and negatively;
  • Give examples of some of the consequences of behaving in an unacceptable, unhealthy or risky way.
  1. Who helps us stay healthy and safe?
  • Explain how different people in the school and local community help them stay healthy and safe;
  • Define what is meant by ‘being responsible’;
  • Describe the various responsibilities of those who help them stay healthy and safe;
  • Suggest ways they can help the people who keep them healthy and safe.
  1. It’s your right
  • Understand that humans have rights and also responsibilities;
  • Identify some rights and also responsibilities that come with these.
  1. How do we make a difference?
  • Understand the reason we have rules;
  • Suggest and engage with ways that they can contribute to the decision-making process in school (e.g. through pupil voice/school council);
  • Recognise that everyone can make a difference within a democratic process.
  1. In the news
  • Define the word influence;
  • Recognise that reports in the media can influence the way they think about a topic;
  • Form and present their own opinions based on factual information and express or present these in a respectful and courteous manner.
  1. Safety in numbers
  • Explain the role of the bystander and how it can influence bullying or other anti-social behaviour;
  • Recognise that they can play a role in influencing outcomes of situations by their actions.
  1. Logo quiz
  • Understand some of the ways that various national and international environmental organisations work to help take care of the environment;
  • Understand and explain the value of this work.
  1. Harold’s expenses
  • Define the terms ‘income’ and ‘expenditure’;
  • List some of the items and services of expenditure in the school and in the home;
  • Prioritise items of expenditure in the home from most essential to least essential.
  1. Why pay taxes?
  • Explain what is meant by the terms ‘income tax’, ‘National Insurance’ and ‘VAT’;
  • Understand how a payslip is laid out showing both pay and deductions;
  • Prioritise public services from most essential to least essential.
Y5
  1. ‘Thunking’ about habits
  • Explain what a habit is, giving examples;
  • Describe why and how a habit can be hard to change.
  1. Jay’s dilemma
  • Recognise that there are positive and negative risks;
  • Explain how to weigh up risk factors when making a decision;
  • Describe some of the possible outcomes of taking a risk.
  1. Spot bullying
  • Demonstrate strategies to deal with both face-to-face and online bullying;
  • Demonstrate strategies and skills for supporting others who are bullied;
  • Recognise and describe the difference between online and face-to-face bullying.
  1. Ella’s diary dilemma
  • Define what is meant by a dare;
  • Explain why someone might give a dare;
  • Suggest ways of standing up to someone who gives a dare.
  1. Decision dilemmas
  • Recognise which situations are risky;
  • Explore and share their views about decision making  when faced with a risky situation;
  • Suggest what someone should do when faced with a risky situation.
  1. Play, like, share
  • Consider what information is safe/unsafe to share offline and online, and reflect on the consequences of not keeping personal information private;
  • Recognise that people aren’t always who they appear to be online and explain risks of being friends online with a person they have not met face-to-face;
  • Know how to protect personal information online;
  • Recognise disrespectful behaviour online and know how to respond to it.
  1. Drugs: true or false?
  • Understand some of the complexities of categorising drugs;
  • Know that all medicines are drugs but not all drugs are medicines;
  • Understand ways in which medicines can be helpful or harmful and used safely or unsafely.
  1. Smoking: what is normal?
  • Understand the actual norms around smoking and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.
  1. Would you risk it?
  • Identify risk factors in a given situation (involving smoking) and consider outcomes of risk taking in this situation, including emotional risks;
  • Understand the actual norms around smoking/alcohol and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.

 

  1. What’s the story
  • Identify, write and discuss issues currently in the media concerning health and wellbeing;
  • Express their opinions on an issue concerning health and wellbeing;
  • Make recommendations on an issue concerning health and wellbeing.
  1. Fact or opinion?
  • Understand the difference between a fact and an opinion;
  • Understand what biased reporting is and the need to think critically about things we read.
  1. Rights, responsibilities and duties
  • Define the differences between responsibilities, rights and duties;
  • Discuss what can make them difficult to follow;
  • Identify the impact on individuals and the wider community if responsibilities are not carried out.
  1. Mo makes a difference
  • Explain what we mean by the terms voluntary, community and pressure (action) group;
  • Give examples of voluntary groups, the kind of work they do and its value.
  1. Spending wisely
  • State the costs involved in producing and selling an item;
  • Suggest questions a consumer should ask before buying a product.
  1. Lend us a fiver!
  • Define the terms loan, credit, debt and interest;
  • Suggest advice for a range of situations involving personal finance.
  1. Local councils
  • Explain some of the areas that local councils have responsibility for;
  • Understand that local councillors are elected to represent their local community.
Y6
  1. Think before you click
  • Accept that responsible and respectful behaviour is necessary when interacting with others online and face-to-face;
  • Understand and describe the ease with which something posted online can spread.
  1. Traffic lights
  • Identify strategies for keeping personal information safe online;
  • Describe safe behaviours when using communication technology.
  1. To share or not to share?[Share video at end of lesson and not start]
  • Know that it is illegal to create and share sexual images of children under 18 years old;
  • Explore the risks of sharing photos and films of themselves with other people directly or online;
  • Know how to keep their information private online.
  1. Rat park
  • Define what is meant by addiction, demonstrating an understanding that addiction is a form of behaviour;
  • Understand that all humans have basic emotional needs and explain some of the ways these needs can be met.
  1. What sort of drug is…?
  • Explain how drugs can be categorised into different groups depending on their medical and legal context;
  • Demonstrate an understanding that drugs can have both medical and non-medical uses;
  • Explain in simple terms some of the laws that control drugs in this country.
  1. Drugs: it’s the law!
  • Understand some of the basic laws in relation to drugs;
  • Explain why there are laws relating to drugs in this country.
  1. Alcohol: what is the normal?
  • Understand the actual norms around drinking alcohol and the reasons for common misperceptions of these;
  • Describe some of the effects and risks of drinking alcohol.
  1. Joe’s story (part 1)
  • Understand that all humans have basic emotional needs and explain some of the ways these needs can be met;
  • Explain how these emotional needs impact on people’s behaviour;
  • Suggest positive ways that people can get their emotional need met.
  1. Joe’s story (part 2)
  • Understand and give examples of conflicting emotions;
  • Understand and reflect on how independence and responsibility go together.
  1. Two sides to every story
  • Define the terms ‘fact’, ‘opinion’, ‘biased’ and ‘unbiased’, explaining the difference between them;
  • Describe the language and techniques that make up a biased report;
  • Analyse a report also extract the facts from it.
  1. Fakebook friends
  • Know the legal age (and reason behind these) for having a social media account;
  • Understand why people don’t tell the truth and often post only the good bits about themselves, online;
  • Recognise that people’s lives are much more balanced in real life, with positives and negatives.
  1. What’s it worth?
  • Explain some benefits of saving money;
  • Describe the different ways money can be saved, outlining the pros and cons of each method;
  • Describe the costs that go into producing an item;
  • Suggest sale prices for a variety of items, taking into account a range of factors;
  • Explain what is meant by the term interest.
  1. Jobs and taxes
  • Recognise and explain that different jobs have different levels of pay and the factors that influence this;
  • Explain the different types of tax (income tax and VAT) which help to fund public services;
  • Evaluate the different public services and compare their value.
  1. Action stations!
  • Explain what we mean by the terms voluntary, community and pressure (action) group;
  • Describe the aim, mission statement, activity and beneficiaries of a chosen voluntary, community or action group.
  1. Project Pitch (parts 1 & 2)

 

  1. Happy shoppers
  • Explain what is meant by living in an environmentally sustainable way;
  • Suggest actions that could be taken to live in a more environmentally sustainable way.
  1. Democracy in Britain 1 – Elections

 

  1. Democracy in Britain 2 – How (most) laws are made

 

Summer 1 Summer 2
Being My Best Growing and Changing
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Feel resilient and confident in their learning.
  • Name and discuss different types of feelings and emotions.
  • Learn and use strategies or skills in approaching challenges.
  • Understand that they can make healthy choices.
  • Name and recognise how healthy choices can keep us well.
 Overarching learning intentions across this unit

  • Understand that there are changes in nature and humans.
  • Name the different stages in childhood and growing up.
  • Understand that babies are made by a man and a woman.
  • Use the correct vocabulary when naming the different parts of the body.
  • Know how to keep themselves safe.
FS2
  1. Bouncing back when things go wrong
  • Share an experience where they haven’t achieved their goal.
  • Develop their confidence and resilience towards having a growth mindset.
  • Name a strategy to overcome a hurdle.
  1. Yes, I can!
  • Recognise that some skills take time to learn.
  • Plan and review an achievable goal.
  • Celebrate the successes of their peers.
  1. Healthy eating (1)
  • Name and choose healthy foods and drink.
  • Understand there are some foods that are a “just sometimes” food or drink (eating in moderation).
  • Explain the jobs of different food groups.
  1. Healthy eating (2)
  • Name and choose healthy foods and drink.
  • Understand there are some foods that are a “just sometimes” food or drink (eating in moderation).
  • Explain the jobs of different food groups.
  1. Move your body
  • Describe the changes in their body during exercise and what is happening to their body.
  • Explain how exercise can help us stay well – physically and mentally.
  • Name some ways to keep their body fit and well.
  1. A good night’s sleep
  • Understand why our body needs sleep.
  • Talk about their own bedtime routine.
  • Suggest ways to have a calm evening and bedtime routine.
  1. Seasons
  • Name the different seasons and describe their differences.
  • Explain the changes that occur as seasons change.
  • Talk about how they have grown in resilience.
  1. Life stages- plants, animals, humans
  • To understand that animals and humans change in appearance over time.
  • Use relevant vocabulary such as egg, seed, baby, grow, change, old, young (and the names for young animals).
  • Make observations and ask questions about living things.
  1. Life stages: Humans life stage- who will I be?
  • Retell a story and respond to questions about it.
  • Use the language and describe the different life stages of: baby, child, teenager, adult, older age.
  • Talk about their own experience of growing up.
  1. Where do babies come from?
  • [Exclude activity 1 and 2 from the SCARF session]
  • Explain that a baby is made by a woman and a man, and grows inside a mother’s tummy.
  • Understand that every family is different.
  • Talk about similarities and differences between themselves and others.

 

  1. Getting bigger
  • Talk about how they have changed as they have grown.
  • Explain the differences between babies, children, and adults.
  • Understand that we are all unique.

 

  1. Me and my body- girls and boys
  • Name parts of the body (including reproductive parts ‘penis’ and ‘vulva’) using the correct vocabulary.
  • Explain which parts of their body are kept private and safe and why.
  • Tell or ask an appropriate adult for help if they feel unsafe.

[exclude activity relating to egg and sperm]

Y1
  1. I can eat a rainbow
  • Recognise the importance of fruit and vegetables in their daily diet;
  • Know that eating at least five portions of vegetables and fruit a day helps to maintain health.
  1. Eat well
  • Recognise that they may have different tastes in food to others;
  • Select foods from the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate) in order to make a healthy lunch;
  • Recognise which foods we need to eat more of and which we need to eat less of to be healthy.
  1. Catch it! Bin it! Kill it!
  • Understand how diseases can spread;
  • Recognise and use simple strategies for preventing the spread of diseases.
  1. Harold learns to ride his bike
  • Recognise that learning a new skill requires practice and the opportunity to fail, safely;
  • Understand the learning line’s use as a simple tool to describe the learning process, including overcoming challenges.
  1. Pass on the praise!
  • Demonstrate attentive listening skills;
  • Suggest simple strategies for resolving conflict situations;
  • Give and receive positive feedback, and experience how this makes them feel.

 

  1. Harold has a bad day
  • Recognise how a person’s behaviour (including their own) can affect other people.
  1. Inside my wonderful body!
  • Name major internal body parts (heart, lungs, blood, stomach, intestines, brain);
  • Understand and explain the simple bodily processes associated with them.
  1. Taking care of a baby
  • Understand some of the tasks required to look after a baby;
  • Explain how to meet the basic needs of a baby, for example, eye contact, cuddling, washing, changing, feeding.
  1. Then and now
  • Identify things they could do as a baby, a toddler and can do now;
  • Identify the people who help/helped them at those different stages.
  1. Who can help? (2)
  • Explain the difference between teasing and bullying;
  • Give examples of what they can do if they experience or witness bullying;
  • Say who they could get help from in a bullying situation.
  1. Surprises and secrets
  • Explain the difference between a secret and a nice surprise;
  • Identify situations as being secrets or surprises;
  • Identify who they can talk to if they feel uncomfortable about any secret they are told, or told to keep.

 

  1. Keeping privates private
  • Identify parts of the body that are private;
  • Describe ways in which private parts can be kept private;
  • Identify people they can talk to about their private parts.
Y2
  1. You can do it!
  • Explain the stages of the learning line showing an understanding of the learning process;
  • Help themselves and others develop a positive attitude that support their wellbeing;
  • Identify and describe where they are on the learning line in a given activity and apply its positive mindset strategies to their own learning.
  1. My day
  • Understand and give examples of things they can choose themselves and things that others choose for them;
  • Explain things that they like and dislike, and understand that they have choices about these things;
  • Understand and explain that some choices can be either healthy or unhealthy and can make a difference to their own health.
  1. Harold’s postcard- helping us to keep clean and healthy
  • Explain how germs can be spread;
  • Describe simple hygiene routines such as hand washing;
  • Understand that vaccinations can help to prevent certain illnesses.
  1. Harold’s bathroom
  • Explain the importance of good dental hygiene;
  • Describe simple dental hygiene routines.
  1. My body needs…
  • Understand that the body gets energy from food, water and oxygen;
  • Recognise that exercise and sleep are important to health
  1. What does my body do?
  • Name major internal body parts (heart, blood, lungs, stomach, small and large intestines, brain);
  • Describe how food, water and air get into the body and blood.

 

  1. A helping hand
  • Demonstrate simple ways of giving positive feedback to others.
  1. Sam moves away
  • Recognise the range of feelings that are associated with losing (and being reunited) with a person they are close to.
  1. Haven’t you grown!
  • Identify different stages of growth (e.g. baby, toddler, child, teenager, adult);
  • Understand and describe some of the things that people are capable of at these different stages.
  1. My body, your body
  • Identify which parts of the human body are private;
  • Explain that a person’s genitals help them to make babies when they are grown up;
  • Understand that humans mostly have the same body parts but that they can look different from person to person.
  1. Respecting privacy
  • Explain what privacy means;
  • Know that you are not allowed to touch someone’s private belongings without their permission;
  • Give examples of different types of private information.

6. Basic first aid

Y3
  1. Derek cooks dinner! (healthy eating)
  • Explain how each of the food groups on the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate) benefits the body;
  • Explain what is meant by the term ‘balanced diet’;
  • Give examples what foods might make up a healthy balanced meal.
  1. Poorly Harold
  • Explain how some infectious illnesses are spread from one person to another;
  • Explain how simple hygiene routines can help to reduce the risk of the spread of infectious illnesses;
  • Suggest medical and non-medical ways of treating an illness.
  1. For or against?
  • Develop skills in discussion and debating an issue;
  • Demonstrate their understanding of health and wellbeing issues that are relevant to them;
  • Empathise with different view points;
  • Make recommendations, based on their research.
  1. I am fantastic!
  • Identify their achievements and areas of development;
  • Recognise that people may say kind things to help us feel good about ourselves;
  • Explain why some groups of people are not represented as much on television/in the media.
  1. Getting on with your nerves!
  • Demonstrate how working together in a collaborative manner can help everyone to achieve success;
  • Understand and explain how the brain sends and receives messages through the nerves.
  1. Body team work
  • Name major internal body parts (heart, blood, lungs, stomach, small and large intestines, liver, brain);
  • Describe how food, water and air get into the body and blood.
  1. Top talents
  • Explain some of the different talents and skills that people have and how skills are developed;
  • Recognise their own skills and those of other children in the class.

 

  1. Relationship Tree
  • Identify different types of relationships;
  • Recognise who they have positive healthy relationships with.
  1. Body space
  • Understand what is meant by the term body space (or personal space);
  • Identify when it is appropriate or inappropriate to allow someone into their body space;
  • Rehearse strategies for when someone is inappropriately in their body space.
  1. Secret or surprise?
  • Define the terms ‘secret’ and ‘surprise’ and know the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;
  • Recognise how different surprises and secrets might make them feel;
  • Know who they could ask for help if a secret made them feel uncomfortable or unsafe.

4. Basic first aid

Y4
  1. What makes me ME!
  • Identify ways in which everyone is unique;
  • Appreciate their own uniqueness;
  • Recognise that there are times when they will make the same choices as their friends and times when they will choose differently.
  1. Making choices
  • Give examples of choices they make for themselves and choices others make for them;
  • Recognise that there are times when they will make the same choices as their friends and times when they will choose differently.
  1. SCARF Hotel
  • Understand that the body gets energy from food, water and oxygen and that exercise and sleep are important to our health;
  • Plan a menu which gives a healthy balanced of foods from across the food groups on the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate).
  1. Harold’s Seven Rs
  • Understand the ways in which they can contribute to the care of the environment (using some or all of the seven Rs);
  • Suggest ways the Seven Rs recycling methods can be applied to different scenarios.
  1. My school community (1)
  • Define what is meant by the word ‘community’;
  • Suggest ways in which different people support the school community;
  • Identify qualities and attributes of people who support the school community.

6. Basic first aid

  1. Moving house
  • Describe some of the changes that happen to people during their lives;
  • Explain how the Learning Line can be used as a tool to help them manage change more easily;
  • Suggest people who may be able to help them deal with change.
  1. My feelings are all over the place!
  • Name some positive and negative feelings;
  • Understand how the onset of puberty can have emotional as well as physical impact
  • Suggest reasons why young people sometimes fall out with their parents;
  • Take part in a role play practising how to compromise.
  1. All change!
  • Identify parts of the body that males and females have in common and those that are different;
  • Know the correct terminology for their genitalia;
  • Understand and explain why puberty happens.
  1. Preparing for periods (formerly Period positive)
  • Know the key facts of the menstrual cycle;
  • Understand that periods are a normal part of puberty for girls;
  • Identify some of the ways to cope better with periods.
  1. Secret or surprise?
  • Define the terms ‘secret’ and ‘surprise’ and know the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;
  • Recognise how different surprises and secrets might make them feel;
  • Know who they could ask for help if a secret made them feel uncomfortable or unsafe.
  1. Together
  • Understand that marriage is a commitment to be entered into freely and not against someone’s will;
  • Recognise that marriage includes same sex and opposite sex partners;
  • Know the legal age for marriage in England or Scotland;
  • Discuss the reasons why a person would want to be married, or live together, or have a civil ceremony.
Y5
  1. Getting fit
  • Know two harmful effects each of smoking/drinking alcohol.
  • Explain the importance of food, water and oxygen, sleep and exercise for the human body and its health.
  • Understand the actual norms around smoking and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.
  1. It all adds up!
  • Know the basic functions of the four systems covered and know they are inter-related.
  • Explain the function of at least one internal organ.
  • Understand the importance of food, water and oxygen, sleep and exercise for the human body and its health.
  1. Different skills
  • Identify their own strengths and talents;
  • Identify areas that need improvement and describe strategies for achieving those improvements.
  1. My school community (2)
  • State what is meant by community;
  • Explain what being part of a school community means to them;
  • Suggest ways of improving the school community.
  1. Independence and responsibility
  • Identify people who are responsible for helping them stay healthy and safe;
  • Identify ways that they can help these people.
  1. Star qualities?
  • Describe ‘star’ qualities of celebrities as portrayed by the media;
  • Recognise that the way people are portrayed in the media isn’t always an accurate reflection of them in real life;
  • Describe ‘star’ qualities that ‘ordinary’ people have.

     7. Basic first aid, including Sepsis Awareness

  1. How are you feeling?
  • Use a range of words and phrases to describe the intensity of different feelings
  • Distinguish between good and not so good feelings, using appropriate vocabulary to describe these;
  • Explain strategies they can use to build resilience.
  1. Taking notice of our feelings
  • Identify people who can be trusted;
  • Understand what kinds of touch are acceptable or unacceptable;
  • Describe strategies for dealing with situations in which they would feel uncomfortable, particularly in relation to inappropriate touch.
  1. Dear Hetty
  • Explain how someone might feel when they are separated from someone or something they like;
  • Suggest ways to help someone who is separated from someone or something they like.
  1. Growing up and changing bodies
  • Identify some products that they may need during puberty and why;
  • Know what menstruation is and why it happens.
  1. It could happen to anyone
  • Identify the consequences of positive and negative behaviour on themselves and others;
  • Give examples of how individual/group actions can impact on others in a positive or negative way.
  1. Help! I’m a teenager – get me out of here!
  • Recognise how our body feels when we’re relaxed;
  • List some of the ways our body feels when it is nervous or sad;
  • Describe and/or demonstrate how to be resilient in order to find someone who will listen to you.
  1. Dear Ash
  • Explain the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;
  • Identify situations where someone might need to break a confidence in order to keep someone safe.
  1. Stop, start, stereotypes
  • Recognise that some people can get bullied because of the way they express their gender;
  • Give examples of how bullying behaviours can be stopped.
Y6
  1. Five Ways to Wellbeing project
  • Explain what the five ways to wellbeing are;
  • Describe how the five ways to wellbeing contribute to a healthy lifestyle, giving examples of how they can be implemented in people’s lives.
  1. This will be your life!
  • Identify aspirational goals;
  • Describe the actions needed to set and achieve these.
  1. Our recommendations
  • Present information they researched on a health and wellbeing issues outlining the key issues and making suggestions for any improvements concerning those issues.
  1. What’s the risk? (1)
  • Identify risk factors in a given situation;
  • Understand and explain the outcomes of risk-taking in a given situation, including emotional risks.
  1. What’s the risk? (2)
  • Recognise what risk is;
  • Explain how a risk can be reduced;
  • Understand risks related to growing up and explain the need to be aware of these;
  • Assess a risk to help keep themselves safe.
  1. Basic first aid, including Sepsis Awareness
    1.Helpful or unhelpful? Managing change

  • Recognise some of the changes they have experienced and their emotional responses to those changes;
  • Suggest positive strategies for dealing with change;
  • Identify people who can support someone who is dealing with a challenging time of change.
  1. I look great!
  • Understand that fame can be short-lived;
  • Recognise that photos can be changed to match society’s view of perfect;
  • Identify qualities that people have, as well as their looks.
  1. Media manipulation
  • Define what is meant by the term stereotype;
  • Recognise how the media can sometimes reinforce gender stereotypes;
  • Recognise that people fall into a wide range of what is seen as normal;
  • Challenge stereotypical gender portrayals of people.
  1. Pressure online
  • Understand the risks of sharing images online and how these are hard to control, once shared;
  • Understand that people can feel pressured to behave in a certain way because of the influence of the peer group;
  • Understand the norms of risk-taking behaviour and that these are usually lower than people believe them to be.
  1. Is this normal?
  • Define the word ‘puberty’ giving examples of some of the physical and emotional changes associated with it;
  • Suggest strategies that would help someone who felt challenged by the changes in puberty;
  • Know where someone could get support if they were concerned about their own or another person’s safety.
  1. Dear Ash
  • Explain the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;
  • Identify situations where someone might need to break a confidence in order to keep someone safe.