Year 6 Preview Learning Archive


21 November 2022

English

This week in English, we will be completing a series of short writing tasks based on our class novel of ‘Goodnight Mr Tom.’ We will be exploring writing in character, with a particular focus on the language spoken by the characters and their particular dialects.

We will also be considering letter writing and the use of the third and the first person as well as ensuring that we are meeting the “all the time” expectations for year six writing.

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: equipment, equipped, especially, exaggerate.

In spelling, we will be thinking about the “i before e except after c” rule which applies to words where the sound spelt by ei is “ee” /i:/.  (There are, however, words where i does indeed come after c, such as science, ancient, or glacier.)  We will introduce the mnemonic: “When an i and an e make the sound ‘ee’, use i before e except after c.” We will be exploring words using ei making an “ee” sound after a soft ‘c’: deceive, conceive, receive, perceive, ceiling. We will also consolidate ei words where ei makes an “ay” sound, such as weight or weigh.

There is a quiz on the following link:

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks2/english/spelling-ie-or-ei/

There is also a lesson produced by Oak Academy on the link below:

https://classroom.thenational.academy/lessons/to-investigate-ee-sound-ie-or-ei-spelling-74t3jc

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating our understanding of subordinate clauses and the use of conjunctions. A subordinate clause contains both a subject and a verb. A subordinate clause must be attached to a main clause as it would not make sense on its own. For example “I was hungry because I missed breakfast”. In this sentence “because I missed breakfast” is the subordinate clause to the main clause “I was hungry”. The subordinate clause may also appear at the beginning of the sentence, for example: “Unless it is the weekend, I don’t eat meat.” Here the subordinate clause is “unless it is the weekend.” Subordinate clauses often start with these words…after, although, as, because, even, how, if, now, once, since, so, than, unless, where, when, whenever, where, wherever, while. These words are known as subordinating conjunctions. There are further explanations on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zqk37p3

Please complete the ‘Subordinate clauses and conjunctions B’ SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘Diving the Depths.’ Please complete the fact retrieval questions from pages 36-37 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In Maths this week, we will be thinking about different units of measure and converting between them. We will be re-visiting metric units and the relationships between mm – cm – m –km, ml –l, g-kg. We will be converting between different units of measures and thinking about the place value involved. We will also be converting between miles and kilometres and having a brief think about some imperial measures.

There are videos and quizzes to help support our learning on the link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z4nsgk7/articles/z63qdp3

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could take a look at some questions from the White Rose Maths Converting Units booklet. The link is below:

Y6 – Converting units

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


14 November 2022

English

This week in English, we will be completing our narrative unit with a focus on setting description. We will continue to discuss how we can improve our own writing, to develop or challenge the description.

  • Think about the need to ensure that the character (and the reader) has a strong reaction to this place and how we can enhance this feeling.
  • Remember to include all the senses.
  • Consider the effective use of synonyms.
  • Leave elements unsaid.
  • Include a well-placed line of dialogue from inside the character’s head.

You may wish to explore a thesaurus to extend vocabulary choices, making a word list of some possible, descriptive vocabulary. There are helpful suggestions on using a thesaurus on the link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zcc2gdm/articles/zf96ncw

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: dictionary, disastrous, embarrass, environment.

In spelling, we will be working on -ous endings with straightforward adding of -ous to words like danger and poison, and then higher-frequency -ious or -eous endings such as various, curious. Think about breaking the words up into syllables and spelling each part, e.g. poi-son-ous. You could even write the -ous suffix in a different colour or highlight any tricky parts to the word. Year 3 /4 statutory words: famous, various. Year 5 /6 statutory words: conscious, disastrous, marvellous, mischievous. There is further information on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zqqsw6f/articles/zqcpv9q

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating our understanding of synonyms and antonyms. Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning: words such as happy, cheerful and merry or words such as sad, miserable and heartbroken. Antonyms are words with opposite meanings: words such as angry and peaceful or words such as funny and serious. You may like to use a thesaurus to find synonyms and antonyms for words.

You may like to watch the video and complete the quiz on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zfkk7ty/articles/z8t8pbk

There are further explanations, videos and songs on the ‘School Run’ website:

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-synonyms-and-antonyms

Please complete the ‘Synonyms and antonyms A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary. Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please complete the word meaning, summary and comparison questions from pages 30-31of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be completing our unit of work on fractions. This week we will be consolidating how to find fractions of amounts with unit and non-unit fractions. One of the ways we will think about this process is through the use of the bar model. If we know that 1/5 of 40 kg is equal to 8 kg, how can we find 2/5 of 40 kg? To find 2/5, we need to find the total value of 2 of the parts. 2 × 8 kg = 16 kg therefore 2/5 of 40 kg = 16 kg.

You could also watch episode 5 – fractions – on the following link:

https://whiterosemaths.com/maths-with-michael

There are explanations, activities and videos on the following link too:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zt8dmp3/articles/zjtg47h

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could take a look at some questions from the White Rose Maths Block 3 – Fractions booklet (B.) The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-3-Fractions-B-2020.pdf

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


07 November 2022

English

This week in English, we will be continuing to write a narrative with a focus on setting description. We will be taking inspiration again from the text called ‘My Iceland.’

We will begin by creating a boxed up plan for our text, based on overall similarity to the initial text. In our story, we need to focus on describing the fantasy landscape.

Remember, the content of vocabulary and grammar choices are important in year six– aim high! Think back to how we developed the initial setting images by crafting the language and use a thesaurus to choose some really impactful vocabulary. It may be useful to google images of the country of Iceland or watch some online videos to give you some initial inspiration.

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: definite, desperate, determined, develop.

In spelling lessons, we will be exploring words that end in the suffixes -able or -ible. We will be discussing the convention that we normally add -able if the root word is a complete, recognisable word, e.g. lock > lockable, consider > considerable. The -ible ending is generally used if a complete root word cannot be heard before it, e.g. poss > possible. We will also be thinking about the fact that we normally just add the suffix to the root word. However:

  • If the word ends in an e or consonant +y, then the usual rules of dropping the e or changing y to an i apply, e.g. excite> excitable, rely> reliable.
  • If the -able ending is added to a word ending in -ce or -ge, the e after the c or g must be kept, as those letters would otherwise have their hard sounds (as in cap and gap) before the a of the -able ending, e.g. change > changeable, notice > noticeable. There is further explanation on the links below:

https://www.ecenglish.com/learnenglish/lessons/when-use-able-and-ible

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhHuVWtMMbg

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating our understanding of modal verbs (or probability words.) These are verbs that indicate likelihood, ability, permission or obligation. Words like: can/could, may/might, will/would, shall/should and must. In the sentence: “The Sea Monster should go away,” ‘should’ is the modal verb as it indicates the likelihood of the Sea Monster going away.

You may like to watch the video and complete the quiz on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zps4pbk

There are further explanations, videos and songs on the ‘School Run’ website:

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-modal-verbs

Please complete the ‘Probability Words’ task on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please complete the inference questions on pages 28-29 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

 

Maths

In maths, we will be continuing our unit of work on fractions. This week we will be learning how to multiply and divide fractions. To multiply fractions, you need to multiply the numerators together and multiply the denominators together. To divide fractions, we will be using the KFC method – Keep the first, Flip the second, Change the sign.

 

 

There are explanations, activities and videos on the following links:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/z8fyv4j

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z2b83k7/revision/3

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could take a look at some questions from the White Rose Maths Block 3 – Fractions booklet (B.) The link is below:

 

Y6 -Fractions

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


01 November 2022

English

This week in English, we will be writing a narrative with a focus on setting description. We will be exploring and interpreting a text called ‘My Iceland,’ as well as the wordless picture book ‘Journey’ by Aaron Becker. Here is a link to explore:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWqhNpjvcSs

You may like to practise writing about a setting by choosing a picture to describe in detail e.g. a door, a turret, the grass, the sky. What can you see? Choose three key words that describe that feature. Can you improve these initial choices using a thesaurus?

Change the word into a short phrase thinking about adjectives / nouns / verbs / adverbs e.g. towering trees were rising relentlessly, ghostly lanterns are glowing menacingly, cobbled paths wind furiously.

Think about how you can combine your ideas into an interesting or powerful sentence e.g. ‘The quivering leaves balanced precariously on the tree’s frail branches.’ Write short description for one of the images, including all the senses and / or examples of figurative language.

There is further support and suggestions about writing a setting descriptions on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx339j6/articles/zdfytrd

 

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: convenience, correspond, criticise, curiosity.

In spelling lessons, we will be exploring words ending in -cial or –tial. We will be discussing the rule that we normally add -cial if the root word ends with a vowel, and -tial if the root word ends with a consonant. We will also be considering how we can turn these adjectives into adverbs by adding -ly in the same way as we have for other adjectives in the past. For example, the addition of -ly to words: confidential > confidentially, official > officially. There are some quizzes and games to support your understanding on the following link:

https://wordwall.net/en-gb/community/cial-tial

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating our understanding of parenthesis and commas. Parenthesis is adding extra information to a sentence using brackets, dashes or commas. Parenthesis adds extra information to a sentence or a paragraph but the passage should still make sense without it. This can be done using: brackets, dashes or commas. For example: ‘The case was worn – and very full – and its straps struggled to keep in its contents.’ Here’s another example: ‘James (who was terrified of heights) was taking part in a charity skydive at the weekend.’ The sentence still makes sense without the words inside the brackets, it’s just a bit more interesting with the added detail.

You may like to watch the video on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zmfc7ty/articles/z7hppg8

There are further explanations, videos and activities on the ‘School Run’ website:

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-is-parenthesis

Please complete the ‘Parenthesis and commas A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please complete the fact retrieval questions on pages 26-27 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

 

Maths

In maths, we will be continuing our unit of work on fractions. This week we will be learning how to add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions. When fractions do not have the same denominator, before we can add the fractions together, we must first create equivalent fractions that have common denominators. For example to complete the calculation 3/5 + 2/7 we could use the common denominator of 35 and make 21/35 + 10/35.  Now that the denominators are the same, we can add the numerators and put the answer over the same denominator e.g. 31/35.

There are explanations, activities and videos on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/z9n4k7h

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could take a look at some questions from the White Rose Maths Block 3 – Fractions booklet (A.) The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-3-Fractions-A-2020.pdf

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


17 October 2022

English

This week in English, we will be completing our unit of work based on discussion texts. We will be holding a formal classroom debate to finally answer the questions which are important to us. We will include our own knowledge as well as any facts we have discovered and can use to support our opinions. The following video explains what a debate is and how to present and evaluate facts and opinions when debating.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zxvv4wx

 

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: competition, conscience, conscious, controversy.

In spelling lessons, we will revising the year 5 / 6 words we have learnt this half term and testing our knowledge. Here is a reminder:

accommodate, accompany, according, achieve, aggressive, amateur, ancient, apparent, appreciate, attached, available, average, awkward, bargain, bruise, category, cemetery, committee, communicate, community, competition, conscience, conscious, controversy.

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating our understanding of fronted adverbials. Adverbials are words or phrases that give more information to the sentence. E.g. “I discovered fronted adverbials earlier today.” ‘Earlier today’ is the adverbial. A fronted adverbial is when the adverbial word or phrase is moved to the front of the sentence, before the verb.” Earlier today, I discovered fronted adverbials.” So here, ‘earlier today’ is a fronted adverbial.

You may like to complete the quiz on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zp937p3

Please complete the ‘Fronted adverbials A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

There is no comprehension text for this week. Instead, please can you look over all the pages we have completed this half term and identify any areas you are more and less confident with.  Think about the preciseness of your answers.

Maths

In maths, we will be beginning our unit of work on fractions. This week we will be finding equivalent fractions, using common factors to simplify fractions, converting between mixed numbers and improper fractions and vice versa and comparing and ordering fractions including fractions greater than one.

There are explanations, activities and videos on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/zcdgxfr

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/zxcfjty

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could take a look at the opening questions from the White Rose Maths Block 3 – Fractions booklet (A.) The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-3-Fractions-A-2020.pdf

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


10th October 2022

English

This week in English, we will be continuing our unit of work based on discussion texts. We will be completing our texts, focussing on our conclusion. This is the point of the text where, as an author, you need to bring a sense of conclusion and balance, but also make a decision as to for or against. Try to include a variety of phrases for drawing conclusions e.g. In conclusion…, to sum up…, Having considered…, In the light of…, given these arguments …, On the whole…, By and large…, In the circumstances…, All things considered…

Time will also be given to edit your own and a partner’s work with attention to one element of the toolkit only. Have you fulfilled that criteria? This may require particular paragraphs to be re-written or key elements to be modified and improved e.g. vocabulary, grammar or punctuation.

  • Keep in mind what makes an effective text and think about power of vocabulary choices and impact of changes.
  • Consider modal verbs e.g. should rather than could.
  • Look for opportunities to include reported speech.
  • Find other opportunities to address readers directly from time to time to hold attention and draw them in to the arguments:  inviting them to speculate e.g. You may be wondering why…,    asking questions e.g. How would you like to meet one  of these creatures on your way home…  using exclamations e.g. …and they smell horrible!

We will also be beginning to plan a second discussion text thinking about whether or not something should be ‘given up,’ for example – homework, school uniform.

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: cemetery, committee, communicate, community.

In spelling lessons, we will be thinking about the convention that we normally double a single consonant in a multi syllable word after a short vowel sound and how this can be helpful in learning some of the Y3/4 and Y5/6 spelling list words. We will be trying to identify the short vowels and double consonants and attempting to spell the words below:

Year 3 /4 examples: appear, arrive, different, difficult, disappear, grammar, occasion, opposite, possess, possible, pressure, suppose.

Year 5 /6 examples: accommodate, accompany, according, aggressive, apparent, appreciate, attached, committee, communicate, community, correspond, embarrass, equipped, exaggerate, excellent, harass, immediate, interrupt, marvellous, occupy, occur, opportunity, sufficient, suggest.

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be consolidating the concept of cohesion and how to make a piece of writing flow.  We will be looking at particular grammar which aids cohesion, for example – adverbials or conjunctions. What does cohesion do?

  • It keeps order in the paragraph.
  • Related ideas are kept together.
  • It makes it easier for the reader to understand the text.
  • Ideas flow more smoothly.
  • It provides links between ideas.

 

You may like to watch the video on the following link:

https://youtu.be/CQBcWXO_oVQ

Please complete the ‘Linking ideas and cohesion A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please complete the word meaning, summary and language questions on pages 20-21 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be thinking about how we can use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy. Estimating the answer of a calculation serves as a sense-check on whether your answer is correct, and this can be done either before or after a calculation. We will also be considering how to work out other facts from a given fact using our knowledge of place value, inverse operations, commutativity and mental strategies.

There are further explanations and videos on the following links: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zh8dmp3/articles/z874h39

 

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-estimate

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could look again at the questions from the White Rose Maths Block 1 – Four Operations home learning booklet (A) – but this time, make an estimate for each question. The link is below:

 

Y6 – Four operations

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.

 


03 October 2022

English

This week in English, we will be beginning a unit of work based on discussion texts. We will be discussing and debating various issues, considering view for, views against and our own personal opinions. We will be exploring examples of discussions texts and discovering how they have to put forward both sides of an argument before reaching a conclusion. As a class, we are going to answer the question – ‘Should daleks be allowed on Earth?’ and writing our own texts based on this discussion, linking ideas to our topic of ‘Time Travellers.’ You may like to start to think about how you would answer this question, ensuring that you consider both sides of the argument. The following table suggests some features which may be helpful in a discussion text:

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: awkward, bargain, bruise, category.

In spelling lessons, we will be continuing exploring rules for applying suffixes, this time, looking at those beginning with vowel letters: -ed and -ing / -er and -est / -y – . Do we keep, chop or change the ending? Look at the rules below, can you think of further examples?

When you add suffixes beginning with vowel letters, you either:

  • Do nothing, just add the suffix (where word ends in two consonants) – sort, sorting, sorted / long, longer, longest.
  • Drop e and add the suffix – dance, dancing, danced / nice, nicer, nicest.
  • Change y to i and add the suffix (where the word ends with consonant followed by a y and only for -ed) – reply, replying, replied / copy, copying, copied but play, playing, played / noisy, noisier, noisiest.
  • Double the consonant and add the suffix (where the word ends in a short vowel sound and consonant) – shop, shopping, shopped / fit, fitting, fitted / fit, fitter, fittest.

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be revising apostrophes for possession and contraction with a further exploration of plural apostrophes. An apostrophe can be used to show that one thing belongs to or is connected to something. This is called a possessive apostrophe. Let’s take a look at some examples.

The cat’s tail was fluffy. Cat is a singular noun so you need to add an apostrophe and “s” to show that the tail belongs to the cat.

Charles’ cat was naughty. Charles is a singular noun that ends in an “s”, so you need to add an apostrophe to show that the cat belongs to Charles.

The brothers’ feet were muddy. Brothers is a plural noun that ends in an “s” so you don’t add another “s” after your apostrophe. You can just add an apostrophe to show the feet belongs to the brothers.

The children’s toys were broken. Children is a plural noun but it doesn’t end with an “s” so you need to add an apostrophe and “s” to show that the toys belong to the children.

You may like to watch the videos and try the quiz on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zvwwxnb/articles/zx9ydxs

Please complete the ‘Apostrophes and Plurals A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please complete the inference questions on pages 18-19 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be learning to divide, building to dividing four digit numbers by two digit numbers using the formal written method of long division. If the number which we are dividing by is quite large, it can be useful to write the multiples in a list before beginning. (See the example below.)

There are further explanations and videos on the following link:

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-is-long-division

If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could complete questions from the White Rose Maths Block 1 – Four Operations home learning booklet (A). The link is below:

 

Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-2-Four-operations-A-2020

There are also a video for you to watch at home with your parents on multiplication from the link to White Rose, Maths with Michael, Episode 4 – Division below:

https://whiterosemaths.com/maths-with-michael

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


26 September 2022

English

This week in English, we will be continuing to look at stories which contain a ‘time slip’ or a ‘flashback.’ We will be continuing writing our own stories based on an extract with a flashback from the Pixar movie ‘Up.’ We will be finding clues which suggest the flashback elements and discussing how it evokes an emotional response from the watcher / reader. How can we get an emotional reaction from our reader? Focus on how the character is feeling / how they move in and out of the flashback. The use of dialogue could also feature here. This flashback text will be written in the first person – I – looking back on events through the central man’s eyes – putting themselves into his shoes.

The flashback for ‘Up’ is available on the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2bk_9T482g

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: appreciate, attached, available, average.

In spelling lessons, we will be exploring rules for applying suffixes beginning with consonant letters. -ment, -ness, -ful , -less, -ly.

  • The suffixes -ness and -ment will generate a noun from an adjective or verb, such as: A happy child is full of happiness, or I enjoy singing as it gives me enjoyment.
  • The suffixes -ful and -less will turn a noun into an adjective: If you do not have a penny, you are penniless.
  • The suffix -ly will convert an adjective into an adverb: When people are kind, they behave kindly towards others.

How many words can you think of with the suffixes -ment, -ness, -ful, -less and –ly?

You may like to watch the video below which explains how suffixes are added to the root word:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/english-ks2-wonderful-words-suffixes-part-2/zvjvrj6

 

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be revising direct speech and how to use full speech punctuation. Here are a few general rules for punctuating speech:

  • Start a new line for a new speaker.
  • Add a comma before the opening speech marks.
  • Open and close speech with speech marks (or inverted commas).
  • Begin what is spoken with a capital letter.
  • End the line of speech with a comma, exclamation mark or question mark.

 

There are further explanations of the rules, with videos to watch, on the link below:

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-direct-and-indirect-speech

Please complete the ‘Direct speech punctuation A and B’ tasks on SPAG.com. Your logins will be in your reading diary.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please complete the fact retrieval questions on pages 16-17 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be learning about square and cubed numbers. A square number is a number multiplied by itself. The square numbers up to 100 are 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, and 100. A cube number is a number multiplied by itself 3 times. The cube numbers up to 100 are 1, 8, 27, and 64. Cube numbers can be depicted as three-dimensional cubes.

We will also be revising the formal written method of long multiplication, moving up to multiplying a four-digit number by a two-digit number. If you wish to consolidate this work at home, you could complete questions from the White Rose Maths Block 1 – Four Operations home learning booklet (B). The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-2-Four-operations-B-2020.pdf

There are also a video for you to watch at home with your parents on multiplication from the link to White Rose, Maths with Michael, Episode 3 – Multiplication below:

https://whiterosemaths.com/maths-with-michael

If you need further reminders about written multiplication strategies, you could also watch the videos, try the quiz and complete the activities on BBC Bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z4chnrd

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


20 September 2022

English

This week in English, we will be continuing to look at stories which contain a ‘time slip’ or a ‘flashback.’ We will be writing our own stories based on a video called ‘The Piano,’ by Aidan Gibbons and an extract with a flashback from the Pixar movie ‘Up.’ We will be considering how important it is to move the reader cohesively between the present time and the flashback.

 

 

The film ‘The Piano’ can be accessed on the following link:

https://vimeo.com/57315645

 

 

 

The flashback for ‘Up’ is available on the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2bk_9T482g

 

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: aggressive, amateur, ancient, apparent.

In spelling lessons, we will be learning to distinguish between the spelling and meaning of homophones. A homophone is a word that sounds the same as another but is spelt differently, e.g. mail, male; to, too, two. We will be identifying some of the pairs of homophones from Y3/4 and Y5/6 teaching, where one of the words is a verb, for example: passed / past, missed / mist, guessed / guest, allowed / aloud. We will be discussing how we might recognise which of these is a verb in each case (-ed endings.) We will also be exploring the difference between verbs and nouns such as advice / advise, device / devise, licence / license, practice / practise, prophecy / prophesy, following the convention that nouns are generally spelt with a c and verbs with an s.

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

 

SpellingWordList_Y3-4 

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

Grammar

In grammar, we will be revising relative clauses. A relative clause can be used to give additional information about a noun. They are introduced by a relative pronoun like ‘that’, ‘which’, ‘who’, ‘whose’, ‘where’ and ‘when’. For example: ‘I won’t stand by the man who smells of slime.’ In this example, the relative clause is ‘who smells of slime’. It provides more information about the man. The relative pronoun, ‘who’, is used to connect these clauses in the sentence. You may like to complete the quiz below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zsrt4qt

Please complete the ‘Relative clauses’ task on SPAG.com. If you have lost your login details, please ask me.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘Angel of the North.’ Please complete the word meaning, summary and prediction questions on pages 10-11 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be learning about factors, multiples and prime numbers.

A factor is an integer (whole number) that will divide exactly into another number. For example, 8 is a factor of 24 because 8 will divide into 24 exactly 3 times with no remainder.

The multiples of a number are the values in that number’s times table. For example, the multiples of 5 are 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and so on. There are an infinite amount of multiples of any given number.

A prime number is a number with exactly two factors. A prime number is only divisible by 1 and itself. Another way to think of prime numbers is that they are only ever found as answers in their own times tables.

There are further explanations, activities and videos on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zfq7hyc

Please complete your White Rose Maths Block 2 – Four Operations home learning booklet (B) – Questions 2,4,7,8 The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-2-Four-operations-B-2020.pdf

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


12 September 2022

English

This week in English, we will be continuing to look at stories which contain a ‘time slip.’ We will be writing our own stories and editing them to meet year six targets and expectations, completing the following process:

  • Editing for mistakes – Check writing for spelling, punctuation and grammar errors.
  • Editing against toolkit – Highlight key features of language e.g. historical vocabulary, rhetorical questions, short sentences.
  • Editing for improvements to vocabulary and grammar to create impact– focus on improvement of vocabulary and sentence structure. Focus on cohesion within and across paragraphs through sentence starters and use of nouns / pronouns. Consider changes of synonyms for effect and suspense. What changes can they make to impact the reader?

We will also be looking at texts where the character has a flash-back, rather than physically travelling to the past.

Spelling

Our year 5 / 6 words to practise this week are: accommodate, accompany, according, achieve.

This week, we will be continuing our work on revising the statutory spelling lists for years 3 / 4.  We will be highlighting any tricky words and thinking about strategies to learn them, such as splitting up into letter strings or creating mnemonics. A mnemonic is a tool that helps you to memorise something specific, like how to spell a word. For example, the following is a mnemonic for the word ‘necessary’ – ‘one collar and two sleeves’. This mnemonic could help you remember that the word ‘necessary’ has one ‘c’ and two ‘s’s’, which enables you to remember the tricky parts of this spelling.

The complete list of 3 /4 and 5 / 6 words to learn are on the links below:

 

SpellingWordList_Y3-4

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

Grammar

In grammar, we will be revising main and subordinate clauses and conjunctions. A main clause is a clause that contains a subject and an object. Main clauses make sense on their own. E.g. The cat sat down. Sometimes a sentence is made up of two clauses: a main clause and a subordinate clause, which relies on the main clause. A subordinate clause contains a subject and a verb, but it needs to be attached to a main clause because it cannot make sense on its own. For example:

This is a complex sentence (also referred to as a multi-clause sentence). It has a main clause (‘I first met her in Paris’) and a subordinate clause (‘where I lived as a small child’), which relies on the main clause to make sense. The two clauses are joined by the conjunction ‘where’. You can watch the following videos for more information: https://youtu.be/pWS3Cbf5h9U  or  https://youtu.be/ErwKUGfBzhg

Please complete the ‘Subordinate clauses and conjunctions A’ task on SPAG.com. If you have lost your login details, please ask me.

Remember, Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘Angel of the North.’ Please complete the inference questions on pages 8-9 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

 

Maths

In maths, we will be learning to: round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy and using negative numbers in context, calculating intervals across zero.

Please complete your White Rose Maths Block 1 – Place Value home learning booklet– Questions 4 to 11. The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-1-Place-value-2020.pdf

There are also videos, tutorials and quizzes to support your learning on BBC Bitesize on the following links:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zh8dmp3/articles/zpx2qty

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/znwj6sg/articles/zxthnbk

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.


5 September 2022

English

This week in English, we will be looking at stories which contain a ‘time slip.’ We will be exploring how the differences in time are made clear to the reader and the type of clues that are given; how does the vocabulary used help suggest different time periods? We will also be creating our own tool kit for a time slip story:

* use well-chosen adjectives to build the description, e.g. white dust, smashed furniture, crazy angles;

* use historical details to bring the description alive, e.g. gas masks, ‘careless talks,’ Morrison shelters.

* describe what you can see but also use other senses, e.g. smelt of moth balls, the tormented sound of the siren

* use extended punctuation e.g. dashes, ellipses

* use well placed dialogue to set the atmosphere e.g. “God help us! Mum’ll be livid with Hitler.”

* use similes to help the reader imagine what something is like, e.g. his breathing sounded like Darth Vadar.

 

Examples of a Time Slip include:

‘Tom’s Midnight Garden’ – a popular children’s book first published in 1958. Tom discovers a grandfather clock that strikes 13 and then finds a secret garden!

‘A Christmas Carol’ – a very popular novel by Charles Dickens. The main character Scrooge is greeted by ghosts of his past, present, and future!

The popular films ‘Back to the Future’ include a time slip after the main character is accidentally sent back in time.

‘Jumanji’ – another popular film where a character is trapped in a board game.

‘Doctor Who’ – a long-running TV show about a time lord called ‘The Doctor,’ who travels through time in the TARDIS.

Can you think of any others? You may wish to research information about a time period of your choosing in preparation for your story.

Spelling

This week, we will be assessing our knowledge of the statutory spelling lists for years 3 / 4 and years 5 / 6.  We will be sending home a highlighted copy of our current knowledge so that you can see what spellings you still need to learn. The complete lists are in your spelling folders, on the class webpage and on the links below.

 

SpellingWordList_Y3-4

 

SpellingWordList_Y5-6

 

Grammar

In grammar, we will be revising grammar vocabulary from previous years, classifying: nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, determiners and articles. Please login to SPAG.com and attempt Terminology Year 5 A and B. (Ask me if you have lost your login details.)

Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is the following site: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

Reading and Comprehension

Please ensure you are reading with your parents regularly, with at least three comments with parent signatures in your reading diary.

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘Dare to Dance.’ Please complete fact retrieval questions on pages 6-7 of your non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class next Monday.

Maths

In maths, we will be learning to: read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10,000,000 and determine the value of each digit. One way to remember the place value of each digit is through the use of a place value chart:

For example, the number in the chart above is made up of: 4 hundred thousands, 3 ten thousands, 4 thousands, 5 hundreds, 3 tens and 3 ones which makes 434,533. We will be discussing the use of commas to help represent numbers and consolidating our understanding of the value of each column.

To support your learning, you may like to complete the White Rose Maths Block 1 – Place Value home learning booklet– Questions 1 to 3. The link is below:

https://assets.whiterosemaths.com/web-pages/parent-resources/Y6-HL-Autumn-Block-1-Place-value-2020.pdf

There are also videos, tutorials and quizzes to support your learning about place value on BBC Bitesize on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zfjgf82

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field and Mrs Parry.