Year 6 Preview Learning Archive

05 July 2021

This week in English, we will be rehearsing our performance of our summer production of ‘Wow! What a Year.’ When you’re performing in a play you can change the way you speak and move to make the character believable and more interesting to watch. Please continue to practise your words at home, trying to memorise your lines and thinking about the expression, volume and intonation which you are using. Look carefully at the stage directions too. (It would also be helpful to continue to practise the song words and dance routines.)

There is a link to BBC Bitesize below with further information on analysing and performing play scripts:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z7thjsg

This week, in spelling, we are continuing to look at synonyms and antonyms. A synonym is a word that has the same (or nearly the same) meaning as another word. An antonym is a word that has the opposite meaning to another word. We are going to look at synonyms for hot and cold.

Here are this week’s spellings to practise:

  • scorching
  • searing
  • sizzling
  • blistering
  • sweltering
  • chilly
  • frozen
  • arctic
  • bitter
  • wintry

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘The Dragonfly.’ Please complete the fact retrieval and inference questions from pages 34-35 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be looking at a variety of challenges to support our knowledge and application of number. Third Space Learning have created an interesting blog on many of the elements of the year six curriculum for you information:

https://thirdspacelearning.com/blog/year-6-maths/

BBC Bitesize also has a range of lessons for you to consolidate any areas in which you still feel a little wobbly:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/collections/year-6-and-p7-maths-lessons/1

We will also be creating some memory boards using photographs from our time at Burghfield St. Mary’s. In order for us to celebrate your journey through the years at St. Mary’s, we are asking if you could please email any photographs that you have of yourself at school, sports day, or any other school events. Starting school photos would also be wonderful, as would the obligatory baby photograph! Please email them to: headteacher@burghfield.w-berks.sch.uk.

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


21 June 2021

This week in English, we will be consolidating our skills in answering written reading comprehension style questions. Many of these skills are also transferable and useful for the reading you will need to do at KS3.

How to prepare?

  1. Encourage regular reading
  • This should include a range of fiction as well as non-fiction texts, such as leaflets, newspapers and information books. Try a different author or genre to broaden your reading experience.
  • Reading stamina is needed, so tackle longer passages and time how long it takes you to read different texts carefully.
  • Talk to your parents about what you are reading.
  1. Locate information
  • Skim a text, such as a magazine article, to get a quick sense of what it is about. Talk about when this skill might be useful.
  • ‘Scan’ a text to find some key information. For example, glance through a synopsis of a film you are about to watch and find out the main characters’ names.
  1. Practise summarising
  • Pick out five key facts from a non-fiction book.
  • Summarise the chapter you have read in three sentences.
  • Sum up the main character in three words. What evidence do you have for this?
  • Draw a timeline for the story.
  1. Be a detective
  • What did you learn about the main character’s feelings in the part of the book you have just read? What clues helped you work this out?
  • Choose one key point in the story and write a thought bubble for one or more of the characters involved.
  • Predict what might happen next? Have there been any ‘clues’? Your prediction should be based on evidence.
  • Re-read the opening paragraph. Are there any clues about the time or place the story is set?
  1. Look at non-fiction texts
  • Was there anything special about the away the text was laid out? Did it make the information more appealing or easy to read?
  • Look at one of the illustrations. Are there any captions or labels? If not, could you add some?
  1. Explore the words
  • Are there any words you do not know? Could you work them out from the context? How could you check? Keep a list of interesting new words.
  • Find a word that really stands out. Why is it a good word to use? Can you suggest any alternatives?
  • Find an effective description which helps convey a picture or idea. Draw what you imagine based on the words used.
  • Were there any technical or special words used by the author? Can you explain what they mean?
  1. Explore changing viewpoints and ideas
  • Did any characters change as the story progressed? What were they like to begin with? How had they changed by the end?
  • Did your views about a character change as you read the book? Why?
  • When reading a persuasive text or even a newspaper article, did the author make you feel a particular way about the topic in the text? How? Did your view change as you read more about it?
  • Does the text remind you of anything you have read before? How is it similar or different?

This week, in spelling, we are continuing to look at synonyms and antonyms. A synonym is a word that has the same (or nearly the same) meaning as another word. An antonym is a word that has the opposite meaning to another word. We are going to look at synonyms for two of the most overused adjectives in children’s writing, which are antonyms of each other… happy and sad.

Here are this week’s spellings to practise:

  • ecstatic
  • jovial
  • exultant
  • elated
  • delighted
  • despondent
  • forlorn
  • dejected
  • woeful
  • dismal

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 practise SAT 2016.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘Welcome to York.’ Please complete the fact retrieval and inference questions from pages 28-29 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be consolidating various objectives from the year six maths curriculum, with a focus on basic arithmetic with all four operations and our ability to reason.

Please use the link below to practise arithmetic questions in a SAT style format. This should help you to consolidate the basic written methods which you need to use.

Identify any frequent errors or misconceptions and ask at home or at school for some more support in these areas.

https://myminimaths.co.uk/year-6-arithmetic-practice-papers/

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


14 June 2021

This week in English, we will be continuing to look at personification within poems and writing our own poems based on a range of successful models. One of our chosen poems which we will be using as inspiration is ‘Budapest.’ We will be discussing how the pen has a mind of its own, scrawling across the page and spewing forth scribbled animals.

It scribbles, page after page, the passage of time denoted by a change of arm from green sweater to plaid shirt.

The pen also acquires a mind of its own, requiring a little firm handling. Insects crawl from the nib, a bird drinks from the puddled ink.

We will be collecting ideas about what else could arise from the pen and using these ideas to personify the object in a sentence e.g. ‘My pen moves along the page like the snout of some strange animal.’ You can view this poem on the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgnec1r9YuU

This week, in spelling, we are continuing to look at synonyms and antonyms. A synonym is a word that has the same (or nearly the same) meaning as another word. An antonym is a word that has the opposite meaning to another word. We will be focussing on synonyms for ‘large’ and ‘small.’ This week’s spelling are:

  • immense
  • vast
  • gigantic
  • gargantuan
  • mammoth
  • miniature
  • miniscule
  • insignificant
  • microscopic
  • petite

Can you use a thesaurus to find any other synonyms for large or small? Which words could also be antonyms?

 

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

 

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 SATs grammar test I.

 

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘The Clans.’    Please complete the word meaning, summary and language question from pages 24-25 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be consolidating various objectives from the year six maths curriculum, with a focus on multiplying. We will be reminding ourselves of the place value involved in multiplying by 10, 100 and 1000. When you multiply by 10 all the digits move one place to the left E.g. 21 × 10 = 210.

The tens digit moves to the hundreds. The ones digit increases in value to become a ten. Why is there now a zero in the ones column? You need to include a zero to represent the fact that now the other digits have increased in value.

There are now no ones. If you didn’t include the zero in the ones, the number would still look like twenty-one, not two hundred and ten. When you multiply by 100 move all the digits two places to the left. 21 × 100 = 2100. When you multiply by 1000, the digits move three places to the left. 21 x 1000 = 21,000.

There is a quiz and a video to reinforce this learning on BBC Bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z7r492p

We will also be using the formal written method for long multiplication (including with decimals.) Again, there is a helpful quiz and video on BBC Bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z4chnrd

 

Please revise the following examples in your Maths workbook: multiplication – pages 11-13.

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 


07 June 2021

This week in English, we will looking at personification within poems and writing our own poems based on a range of successful models. We will explore how we can bring objects to life through their movements, behaviours or sounds. We will also attempt to improve given examples, for example changing the boring non personified sentence, ‘The shiny red apples sit in their trays’ and personifying the sentence: ‘The rosy cheeked apples happily snuggle together whispering their secrets.’

We will also be considering how to make sentences more powerful and emotive e.g. NOT ‘The vines clamber up the neck of the old oak tree, ‘ instead , ‘The vine’s spindly fingers slowly strangle the wrinkled and withered neck of the old oak.’ Personification is explained on the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zfkk7ty/articles/zw9p8mn

This week, in spelling, we are starting to look at synonyms and antonyms. A synonym is a word that has the same (or nearly the same) meaning as another word. An antonym is a word that has the opposite meaning to another word. We will be focussing on synonyms for ‘said.’

This week’s spelling are:

  • bellowed
  • screeched
  • squealed
  • shrieked
  • squawked
  • whispered
  • murmured
  • breathed
  • sighed
  • muttered

Can you use a thesaurus to find any other synonyms for said? Which words could also be antonyms?

 

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

 

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 SATs grammar test H.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘The Clans.’    Please complete the fact retrieval and inference questions from pages 22-23 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be consolidating division, looking at formal written methods, with a particular focus on long division. We will be looking at how to show our answers as remainders, fractions and decimals.

There is a link to a helpful YouTube video below which shows the process in more detail:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYzWyu_jByk

Please complete the following example in your Maths workbook: division – page 16.

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 


24 May 2021

This week in English, we will continuing to explore the features of a non-chronological report by creating our own reports on dangerous or mythical creatures. We will be developing topic paragraphs and using a thesaurus to extend vocabulary. We will also be reminding ourselves again of the year six requirements for a range of punctuation: commas, colons, semi-colons, ellipses, parenthesis, dashes and hyphens.

This week, in spelling, we are going to be altering our ‘-ible’ words from last week into adverbs ending in ‘-ibly’. The words to learn are:

  • possibly
  • horribly
  • terribly
  • visibly
  • incredibly
  • sensibly
  • forcibly
  • legibly
  • responsibly
  • reversibly

Challenge: Can you use one of your spellings in an active sentence with a relative clause?

For example: The weather was horribly overcast, which was not ideal for the school fete.

 

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 SATs grammar test G.

 

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘If You Can’t go Over or Under, Go Round.’ Please complete the word meaning, summary and structure questions from pages 18-19 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class on the Wednesday after half term.

 

In Maths this week, we will be constructing 2d and 3d shapes by using given dimensions and angles. (See the examples below.)

We will also be looking at nets of 3d shapes. You can support your learning by looking at the link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zt7xk2p/articles/z247tv4

Please complete the following examples in your Maths workbook: angles – page 35 question 2, draw shapes – page 33 question 3 and 3-d shapes – page 32 question 1.

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


17 May 2021

This week in English, we will continuing to explore the features of a non-chronological report by creating our own reports on dangerous or mythical creatures.

We will be developing topic paragraphs and using a thesaurus to extend vocabulary. We will also be reminding ourselves again of the year six requirements for a range of punctuation: commas, colons, semi-colons, ellipses, parenthesis, dashes, hyphens.

 

This week, in spelling, we are going to be looking at words ending in ‘-ible’. How many can you think of? The words are:

  • possible
  • horrible
  • terrible
  • visible
  • incredible
  • sensible
  • forcible
  • legible
  • responsible
  • reversible

Challenge: Can you use one of your spellings in a sentence in the subjunctive form? For example: If I were sensible, I’d finish my homework before tomorrow’s maths lesson.

 

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 SATs grammar test F.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘If You Can’t go Over or Under, Go Round.’ Please complete the fact retrieval and inference questions from pages 16-17 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be constructing 2d and 3d shapes by using given dimensions and angles. (See the examples below.)

We will also be looking at nets of 3d shapes. You can support your learning by looking at the link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zt7xk2p/articles/z247tv4

Please complete the following examples in your Maths workbook: angles – page 35 question 2, draw shapes – page 33 question 3 and 3-d shapes – page 32 question 1.

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


10 May 2021

This week in English, we will be furthering our reading comprehension skills by completing some guided reading tasks together, looking at how we can interpret a text.

Here are some things you can do at home:

  1. Read a wide variety of books

Choose texts with a variety of formats and layouts. Lots of you have favourite authors and genres, but it can be helpful to expand into new types of books every so often – and be sure not to neglect non-fiction texts, such as magazine articles, brochures, adverts, newspaper columns, signs, and notices. Looking at lots of different kinds of texts will give you experience reading in a real-world context. Think about how the texts are presented – the writing will look different depending on what type of text it is from.

  1. Listen to audiobooks.
  2. Carry on reading aloud in preparation for performing your own compositions in class.
  3. Read between the lines. Think about what a book means to you and whether you think there are any less obvious meanings that the author wants us to spot.

Oxford Owl is a great website for further suggestions and activities:

https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/reading/reading-age-10-11-year-6/

This week, we are going to be looking at spelling words with a long /o/ sound spelt ‘ou’ or ‘ow’. Can you think of any of these words? Choose a word and then roll a dice. Work in pairs on your whiteboards. If the dice lands on…

1) find any smaller words within the word 2) write a synonym for the word 3) sky-write the word in the air with your finger 4) speed-write the word as many times as you can in a minute 5) break the word into syllables 6) use the word in a sensible sentence. Here are this week’s spellings to practise: shoulder, smoulder, mould, poultry, soul, shallow, window, blown, known, thrown.

In grammar, we will be continuing revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

 

Please login to SPAG.com and complete KS2 SATs grammar test E.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘A Trip to the Circus.’ Please complete the word meaning questions, prediction question and language questions from pages 12-13 in your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be thinking about our arithmetic and reasoning skills, with a specific focus on formal, written calculations with all four operations. BBC Bitesize has some great quizzes, consolidating year six expectations for addition and subtraction, multiplication and division and fractions.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z2wrf82

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z9rnm39

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zgq93j6

You could also consolidate work on fractions, decimals and percentages by checking your answers to the questions on the following pages in your Maths workbook, pages: 19, 20, and 21.

 

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 


04 May 2021

This week in English, we will be continuing our narrative unit based on creating suspense. We will be continuing looking at examples of suspense writing and taking inspiration from a visual literacy film – ‘Alma.’ We will be considering whether the story is best told in the first or third person and how to create a sense of unease for your reader.

Our spellings for the week are looking at words that can be nouns and verbs, showing how a words position in a sentence can influence its meaning. The words to learn are:

  • produce
  • present
  • reason
  • silence
  • support
  • transport
  • surprise
  • scratch
  • freeze
  • balance

In grammar, we will be revising the grammar terminology covered at key stage two. There is a list and explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

You can also consolidate your learning using the following BBC Bitesize link: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhrrd2p

 

Please also login to SPAG.com and consolidate year 6 terminology A and B.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our new, year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘A Trip to the Circus.’ Please complete the fact retrieval and inference questions on pages 10-11 of your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be looking at angles and reminding ourselves of how to accurately use a protractor. We will also be learning how to recognise angles where they meet on a straight line and to find missing angles. Angles on a straight line always total 180 degrees, when a line is split into 2 and we know one angle, we can always find the other one.

 

Please complete the following examples in your Maths workbook: angles – page 34 question 3, page 35 questions 3 and 4.

You can also support your learning by completing the lesson below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zdp8bqt

You can also consolidate estimating angles using this game:

https://www.math10.com/en/math-games/games/geometry/games-bunny-and-angles.html  

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 


26 April 2021

This week in English, we will be continuing our narrative unit based on creating suspense.

We will be continuing looking at examples of suspense writing and discovering how effectively they meet the suspense toolkit, as well as editing and improving our own suspense attempts. We will also be taking inspiration from a visual literacy film – ‘Road’s End.’

Our spellings for the week are looking at words that can be nouns and verbs, showing how a words position in a sentence can influence its meaning. The words to learn are:

  • challenge
  • protest
  • broadcast
  • benefit
  • charge
  • function
  • influence
  • interest
  • object
  • damage

In grammar, we will be revising linking ideas and cohesion as well as synonyms and antonyms. Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning: words such as – happy, cheerful and merry or sad, miserable and heartbroken. Antonyms are words with opposite meanings: words such as – angry and peaceful or funny and serious. You can use a thesaurus to find synonyms and antonyms for words. You can also find further information on the BBC Bitesize link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zfkk7ty/articles/z8t8pbk

Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

There is also a list an explanation of the grammar terms that you need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

Please login to SPAG.com and consolidate linking ideas and cohesion A and synonyms and antonyms A and B.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our new, year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is still ‘Alternative Santa.’ Please complete the word meaning, summary and comparison questions on pages 6-7 of your poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be continuing with how to construct and interpret pie charts as well as learning how to calculate the mean as an average.  The mean is the total of the numbers divided by how many numbers there are.

To find the mean, add all the numbers together then divide by the number of numbers. E.g. to find the mean of 6, 3, 100, 3, and 13, first find the total: 6 + 3 + 100 + 3 + 13 = 125 then divide by 5: 125÷ 5 = 25. The mean is 25. Please note, the mean is not always a whole number.

 

Please complete the following examples in your Maths workbook.

Pie charts – page 39 question 1 and page 40 question 2.

Mean – page 38 question 2.

You can also support your learning by exploring:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/maths-ks2-pie-and-pie-again-pie-charts/zbbhf4j

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 

 


19 April 2021

This week in English, we will be beginning our narrative unit based on creating suspense. We will be looking at an example of suspense writing and discovering how effectively it meets the following suspense toolkit. To make your story come alive you could:

  • Hide the threat, then make your character hear, see, touch, smell or sense something ominous.
  • Surprise the reader with short, snappy sentences: ‘Then it moved.’ ‘A sudden change.’
  • Include ellipses for an unfinished thought / movement: ‘He wondered if …..’ ‘The door creaked open ….’
  • Consider deliberate word choices: (personification) ‘A mournful, pained cry. The creak was soft at first, just a breath.’
  • Include repetition: ‘The creak.’ ‘Left-right, left-right, left-right.’
  • Slow the action by using the power of three: ‘cold, clammy, dry.’

Our spellings for the week are looking at word families based on common words, showing how words are related in form and meaning.

The words to learn are:

  • programme
  • telegram
  • hologram
  • diagram
  • grammar
  • grammatical
  • parallelogram
  • monogram
  • programmer
  • program.

In grammar, we will be thinking about emotive language and, once again, revising the use of semi-colons and colons as well as subordinate clauses. Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

There is also a list an explanation of the grammar terms that the children need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

Please login to SPAG.com and consolidate semi-colons and colons A and B and subordinate clauses and conjunctions.

The comprehension text for this week will be from our new year 6 poetry comprehension book. The text this week is ‘Alternative Santa.’ Please support your child to complete the fact retrieval and inference questions on pages 4-5 of their poetry workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be remembering how to read and interpret line graphs and pie charts and use these to solve problems. We will also be learning how to illustrate and name parts of circles, including: radius, diameter and circumference and to recognise that the diameter is twice the radius. Please support your child in completing the following examples in their Maths workbook. Line graphs – page 38 question 1, page 39 question 2 and page 40 question 1. Circles – page 31 question 1, as well as page 32 questions 2 and 4.

 

You can also support your child’s learning by exploring: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zvmxsbk/articles/z8c7qty

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.

 


22/03/2021

This week in English, we will be continuing our narrative unit based on creating suspense with a model text entitled: ‘The Nightmare Man.’ We will think about including –ing clauses as starters? (verb /adverb) E.g. grinning menacingly, laughing wildly, whispering softly, crying desperately. These could be used as possible sentence starters to help create tension. We will also be editing and improving our texts in order to ensure that we are meeting year six expectations for writing and highlighting the writer’s tricks which we have used. If time, we will be exploring how some stories can be unexpected with a ‘twisted’ ending.

Our spellings for the week are looking at word families based on common words. The words to learn are: accommodate, accompany, access, accuse, accost, accrue, accuracy, accomplish, accumulate and accentuate.

In grammar, we will be once again revising different grammatical terminology. Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.

There is also a list an explanation of the grammar terms that the children need to know in key stage two on the following weblink:

https://www.sandalcastleprimary.co.uk/uploads/sandal_castle_primary/files/KS_2_Grammar_Glossary.pdf

Please login to SPAG.com and attempt some grammar tests, try Test A and Test B.

The comprehension text for this week will be: ‘Detective Nimble and the Falcon Fugitive.’ Please support your child to complete the inference questions on the sheet which they will bring home (pages 38-39 of their fiction workbook.) We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be continuing to solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples and scale factors. For example, work out the following:

12 apples cost £1.32, how much will 5 apples cost?

3 bananas cost £3.60, how much will 4 bananas cost?

If 5 oranges cost £4.55, how much do 8 oranges cost?

 

You can also support your child’s learning by exploring: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zsq7hyc

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


15th March 2021

This week in English, we will be beginning a narrative unit based on creating suspense with a model text entitled: ‘The Nightmare Man.’

We will be creating a class toolkit for suspense writing, including some of the following techniques:

  • Start the story setting an immediate fear, ‘Gary had always been afraid of …’
  • Hide the threat, then make your character hear, see, touch, smell or sense something ominous.
  • Describe what happens to the body when we are scared: trembling, shaking, blinking rapidly etc.
  • Surprise the reader with short, snappy sentences: ‘Then it moved.’ ‘A sudden change.’
  • Use ellipses for an unfinished thought / movement: ‘He wondered if …..’ ‘The door creaked open ….’
  • Include deliberate word choice: (personification)  ‘A mournful, pained cry. The creak was soft at first, just a breath.’
  • Use repetition: ‘The creak.’  ‘Left-right, left-right, left-right.’
  • Slow the action by using the power of three: ‘cold, clammy, dry.’
  • Reveal what the character is feeling by using an ‘inside/outside’ sentence, e.g. Gary grinned at his friends but inside he was feeling scared.

 

Our spellings for the week are looking at words with a ‘soft c’ spelt /ce./ The words to learn are:

  • cemetery
  • certificate
  • celebrate
  • necessary
  • deceased
  • December
  • sacrifice
  • hindrance
  • nuisance
  • prejudice

In grammar, we will be revising linking ideas and cohesion as well as reminding ourselves about different grammatical terminology. The term ‘cohesive devices’ refers to the conjunctionsconnectives and pronouns used to link the parts of a piece of writing. Using the same verb tense throughout a text also offers ‘cohesion’. For more information, you could look at https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-cohesion-and-cohesive-devices-in-writing

You may also find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and consolidate: Terminology yr. 6 A, terminology yr. 6 B and linking ideas and cohesion A.

(Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

The comprehension text for this week will be: ‘Detective Nimble and the Falcon Fugitive.’ Please support your child to complete the fact retrieval questions on the sheet which they will bring home (pages 36-37 of their fiction workbook.) We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In Maths this week, we will be introducing the language and concepts of ratio, proportion and scale factors. The concept of ratio is used in many daily activities such as cooking, using maps, or reading scale drawings. It can be very helpful to talk to your child about where and why we use ratio in our daily lives. For example:

A flapjack recipe requires 240g of oats. This makes 18 flapjacks. What quantity of oats is needed to make 24 flapjacks? While using ratios with your child, it is worth talking about the difference between ratio and proportion. The concepts are similar but subtly different, and using accurate terms will help your child’s maths skills later on:

  • Ratiotells us how much of one thing there is in relation to another thing. For example, ‘For every 2 apples we have 3 bananas’.
  • Proportiontells us about how much of one thing there is in relation to the whole amount of something. For example, ‘There are 50 pieces of fruit, and 1 in every 5 of those is an apple.’

There are further examples on the Oxford Owl website: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/maths/primary-ratio-proportion/

You can also support your child’s learning by exploring page 33 in their Year 6 Maths Workbook.

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field, Mrs Warkup and Mrs Riggs.


8th March 2021

This week, we will be easing our way back into school with many discussions and activities about our lockdown experiences and how we feel coming back together at school. We will be gently re-establishing ourselves as part of the school and reminding ourselves of our class routines and expectations.

 

This week in English, we will be continuing our narrative unit based on villains.

We will be reflecting on our home learning to create a narrative extract including a villain. The main focus is reminding ourselves of general year six expectations for writing, through sharing our descriptive and imaginative ideas for a particular character.

 

Our spellings for the week are looking at words with endings which sound like /shuhl/ after a consonant letter – ‘tial.’

The words to learn are:

  • partial,
  • confidential,
  • essential,
  • substantial,
  • torrential,
  • sequential,
  • potential,
  • spatial,
  • martial
  • influential.

In grammar, we will be revising the use of hyphens, dashes and bullet points. What’s the difference between a hyphen and a dash? Hyphens are shorter than dashes, and link two words so the word or phrase makes sense. Dashes separate information and are a type of parenthesis, like brackets. Bullet points can be used to:

  • break up complicated information
  • make it easier to read
  • turn it into a list

Don’t forget to add a colon before the list.  For more information, you could take a look at BBC Bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zvwwxnb/articles/zg8gbk7

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zvwwxnb/articles/z2yydxs

You may also find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and revise ‘Hyphens, dashes and bullet points A and B.’

(Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

 

The comprehension text for this week will be from the new fiction comprehension book. The text we are looking at this week is: Beneath the Waves

Please support your child to complete the word meaning, summary and language questions on the sheet which they will bring home (pages 30-31 of their fiction workbook.) We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

 

In Maths this week, we will be consolidating the work we have completed over lockdown on: decimals, percentages, algebra, area, perimeter and volume. We will be reminding ourselves of the different topics and sharing our learning.  We will also be finding out how to find the area of a parallelogram:

 

   

 

You can support your child’s learning by exploring page 28 questions 2 and 4 and page 30 questions 2,3 and 4 in their Maths Workbook or by looking at the following link on BBC Bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z2mtyrd/revision/5

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field.


5th January 2021

This week, we will be introducing our topic of ‘Eager Explorers,’ thinking about people who made discoveries around the world.

Don’t forget that Friday is dress up day, where you need to dress up as an explorer and bring in some information about: who you are, your achievements and difficulties as an explorer, what you discovered and when you made your discovery.

This week in English, we will be introducing a new narrative unit based on creating suspense.

We will be thinking about how the author creates atmosphere by hiding the threat. For example:

It started with a creak. Just a small creak: a cat’s paw stepping on a wooden floor, an old barn door being moved slightly ajar…that kind of thing. And Jack could deal with that kind of thing.

Our spellings for the week are looking at adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words ending in -fer:

  • referring,
  • referred,
  • referral,
  • reference,
  • referee,
  • preferring,
  • preferred,
  • preference,
  • transferring,
  • transference.

In grammar, we will be revising expanded noun phrases. An expanded noun phrase adds more detail to the noun by adding one or more adjectives. An adjective is a word that describes a noun. An expanded noun phrase can also add detail by saying where a noun is. For example: a tree next to the house, some sweets on the floor, the castle by the ocean. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and revise ‘expanded noun phrases,’ or look again at BBC bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/z3nfw6f

(Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

 

The comprehension text for this week will be from the new fiction comprehension book. The text we are looking at this week is: ‘The Perfect Photo.’ Please support your child to complete the fact retrieval questions on pages 6-7 of their fiction workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class next Wednesday.

In maths, we will be revising identifying the value of each digit in numbers given to 3 decimal places.

We will also be multiplying and dividing by 10, 100 and 1000 focussing on moving the digits. When you multiply by 10, 100 or 1000, the place value of the digits change. The number is getting larger so the digits move to the left. When you divide by 10, 100 or 1000, the digits move to the right.

You can support your child’s learning by exploring question 2 on page 12 in their Maths Workbook or by looking at the following link on BBC Bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z7r492p

 

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field.


7th December 2020

This week in English, we will be completing our portal stories, remembering to edit and improve our own writing. We will also be learning how to precis longer passages of text. A précis is a condensed version of a text, keeping the main points and order of the original. Usually it reduces the text to approximately a third of its original length. At KS2 the focus should be on developing the ability to condense information into a shorter version.

There is a useful video and activity on the link below which, although it is aimed at year eight children, I think helps:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zw4rsk7

For spellings, we will be revising both the year 3 /4 list and the year 5 / 6 list. Any extra practise that you can do at home will be really useful. You can find the lists on the following links:

https://cdn.oxfordowl.co.uk/2019/08/29/13/54/08/76f1443d-9b6d-4030-be0d-25fcfef01438/SpellingWordList_Y3-4.pdf

https://cdn.oxfordowl.co.uk/2019/08/29/13/56/09/5a42eb6a-f57f-4dc4-a66e-bd4c5e27e4b7/SpellingWordList_Y5-6.pdf

In grammar, we will be revising suffixes and prefixes.  A prefix is a string of letters that are added to the beginning of a root word, changing its meaning. Each prefix has a meaning (for example, un- means not, sub- means under mis- means wrong or badly, bi- means two.) They will look at words with these prefixes and how that meaning is incorporated into the word, for example: a bicycle has two wheels and a bilingual person is fluent in two languages. Suffixes are groups of letters added to the end of a word. This ‘breaking down’ of words helps children to understand the meaning of other words and to think carefully about how these words are spelt.

 

 

You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and complete ‘Suffixes and prefixes A and B.’

 

 

 

 

 

Our comprehension this week is continuing with the text ‘Diving the Depths.’ Please support your child in completing the word meaning questions, summary questions and comparison question on pages 40-41 of their non-fiction comprehension book. (There is an overall mark page in the back which could be useful.)

In maths, we will be revising the work we have completed this Autumn term and unpicking any misconceptions or areas which we found challenging. We will be focussing on our reasoning skills, trying to answer ‘mastery style questions.’

You can support your child’s learning, by asking them to revisit any areas they are still unsure of, on pages 1 to 18 in their maths workbook.

White Rose Home learning videos are also an excellent resource to reinforce any challenging areas. Ask your child to choose an area they feel they wish to take another look at and follow the link: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-6/

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


30th November 2020

This week in English, we will be thinking about journeying though magical doorways.  We will be writing a list poem and description based on our initial ideas, letting our imaginations run wild!

We will also be beginning to plan a portal story based on stepping through an unusual door.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our spellings for the week include the prefixes micro and mini:

  • minibus,
  • miniskirt,
  • minicam,
  • minibeast,
  • minicab,
  • minimum,
  • microscope,
  • microchip,
  • microphone,
  • microwave.

In grammar, we will be looking at formal and informal language. Formal language is used when we are communicating with people we don’t know very well and want to impress or show respect to. For example, police officers or head teachers. Informal language is used when we are more relaxed and with people we know well. For example, think about how you would answer your best friend if they asked you what you did at the weekend. Now think about how you would answer the same question if your head teacher asked you instead. How would each answer be different? There are useful videos and activities on the following BBC home learning link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zmnvgwx

You may also find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘formal and informal language A and B.’

Our comprehension this week will be based on the text ‘Diving the Depths.’ Please support your child in answering the inference questions on pages 38-39 of their non-fiction comprehension book.

In maths, we will be revising the use of all four operations, particularly in a problem solving context.

 

You can support your child’s learning by asking them to revisit any areas they are still unsure of on pages 1 to 18 in their maths workbook. There are also helpful activities on the BBC bitesize link below: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z429kmn

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


23rd November 2020

 

This week in English, we will be completing a series of short writing tasks based on our class novel, ‘Goodnight Mister Tom.’ We will be attempting: a letter, diary, description and short narrative.  We will also be looking at accent and dialect and how speech can reflect a character’s personality.  See the example of Mister Tom and Willie talking below:

 

Our spellings for the week are word families based on common words:

  • suggest,
  • digest,
  • congestion,
  • gesture,
  • gestation,
  • lightning,
  • daylight,
  • enlighten,
  • twilight,
  • limelight.

In grammar, we will be looking at co-ordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

coordinating conjunction is used to link two independent clauses. For example, ‘and’, ‘but’ and ‘or’.

subordinating conjunction is used to introduce a subordinate clause. For example, ‘although’, ‘after’ and ‘before’. Further explanations can be found on the following links:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/z9wvqhv

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zqk37p3

You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Subordinate clauses and conjunctions B.’

Our comprehension this week will be based on the text ‘Diving the Depths.’ Please support your child in answering the fact retrieval questions on pages 36-37 of their non-fiction comprehension book.

In maths, we will be revising how to use co-ordinates in all four quadrants, alongside the concepts of translation and reflection.

You can support your child’s learning by exploring pages 36 and 37 in their maths workbook. There are also helpful activities on the BBC bitesize link below: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z99n2v4

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.

Click here to see what we did in previous weeks


16th November 2020

This week in English, we will be completing our unit on discussion texts. We will be publishing a ‘perfect’ copy of our work in our ‘Star Write’ books. We will also be learning the skills of debate, building on each other’s viewpoints. You may wish to look at the following link from BBC Bitesize, answering the question – what is a debate?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zxvv4wx/articles/ztx8pbk

Our spellings for the week are word families based on common words:

  • temperature,
  • temper,
  • temperament,
  • tempered,
  • variety,
  • vary,
  • variation,
  • varied,
  • variable,
  • variance.

In grammar, we will be looking at finding synonyms and antonyms.

You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Synonyms and antonyms A and B.’ Alternatively, you could use a thesaurus (or online tool) to make a list of interesting synonyms and antonyms for common words e.g. big, nice, happy etc.

Our comprehension this week will be based on the text ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please support your child in answering the word meaning, summary and structure questions on pages 30-31 of their non-fiction comprehension book.

In maths, we will be thinking about how to associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents. We will also be looking for equivalences between fractions, decimals and percentages.

 

You can support your child’s learning by exploring page 19, questions 3 and 4, in their maths workbook. There are also helpful videos and activities on BBC bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zjckjp3

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


9th November 2020

This week in English, we will be continuing our unit on discussion texts. We will be editing our work towards the year six requirements for writing. (See below.) We will also be asking ourselves what vices we should try to give up, for example: should children give up playing the x box? Should adults give up drinking coffee?

In grammar, we will be looking at using modal verbs. These are verbs that indicate likelihood, ability, permission or obligation. Words like: can/could, may/might, will/would, shall/should and must. For example, in the example: “The Sea Monster should go away,” ‘should’ is the modal verb as it indicates the likelihood of the Sea Monster going away.

 

 

Our spellings for the week are words ending in –ably:

  • adorably,
  • valuably,
  • believably,
  • considerably,
  • tolerably,
  • changeably,
  • noticeably,
  • dependably,
  • comfortably,
  • reasonably.

You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Probability words.’ Alternatively, you could look on BBC Bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zps4pbk.

Our comprehension this week will be based on the text ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please support your child in answering the inference questions on pages 28-29 of their non-fiction comprehension book.

In maths, we will be continuing our unit of work on fractions.

We will be using our KFC method to divide fractions: keep the first number, flip the second and change the sign. For example 5 ÷ 2/3 = 5/1 ÷ 2/3 = 5/1 x 3/2 = 15/2 = 7 1/2.

You can support your child’s learning by exploring page 22, question 5 and page 23, question 3, in their maths workbook. There are also helpful videos and activities on BBC bitesize:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zhw8wty

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


2nd November 2020

 

This week in English, we will be beginning a unit on discussion texts. (See below for an image explaining what is required in a discussion text.) We will be asking ourselves the question: should daleks be allowed on Earth?

Our spellings for the week are words ending in –able:

  • adorable,
  • valuable,
  • advisable,
  • believable,
  • desirable,
  • excitable,
  • knowledgeable,
  • likeable,
  • changeable,
  • noticeable.

In grammar, we will be looking at using parenthesis and commas. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Parenthesis and commas A and B.’ You could also take a look at the following website: (I apologise for the singing in the video but it is a catchy way to remember!)

https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-is-parenthesis

Our comprehension this week will be based on the text ‘From Sketches to Cinema.’ Please support your child in answering the fact retrieval questions on pages 26-27 of their non-fiction comprehension book.

 

In maths, we will be continuing our unit of work on fractions.

We will be consolidating adding and subtracting fractions, including those with mixed numbers and different denominators.  We will also be beginning to multiply fractions.

 

You can support your child’s learning by exploring page 22, question 3, in their maths workbook. There are also helpful videos and activities on BBC bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/z9n4k7h

 https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhdwxnb/articles/z8fyv4j

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


Week Commencing 19th October 2020

This week in English, we will be continuing our unit on biographies, consolidating the features of biographical texts.

We will also be extending our skills of editing and publishing by writing a ‘perfect’ version.

Our spellings for the week are words ending in –able:

  • applicable,
  • tolerable,
  • operable,
  • considerable,
  • dependable,
  • comfortable,
  • reasonable,
  • perishable,
  • breakable,
  • fashionable.

In grammar, we will be looking at using fronted adverbials and commas. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Fronted adverbials A and B.’ You could also take a look at BBC bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zp937p3

There are no set comprehension questions for this week, but you may wish to look through the two texts we have completed so far and identify the style of questions which you find more difficult.

In maths, we will be starting a unit of work on fractions.  We will be looking at how to simplify fractions and find equivalents.  We will also be looking at ordering fractions with different denominators.

 

You can support your child’s learning by exploring page 19 questions 2 and 4 and page 20 question 3, in your maths workbook.  There are also helpful videos and activities on BBC bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zkk6hbk

 

  

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


12th October 2020

 

This week in English, we will be continuing our unit on biographies,

discovering the features of biographical texts

and researching unusual influential figures.

 

 

Our spellings for the week are compound adjectives with hyphens:

  • man-eating,
  • little-used,
  • rock-bottom,
  • wide-eyed,
  • pig-headed,
  • tight-fisted,
  • cold-hearted,
  • stone-faced,
  • green-eyed
  • short-tempered.

In grammar, we will be looking at linking ideas and cohesion. The term ‘cohesive devices’ refers to the conjunctions, connectives and pronouns used to link the parts of a piece of writing. Using the same verb tense throughout a text also offers ‘cohesion’. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Linking ideas and cohesion A and B.’ Alternatively, there is a helpful explanation on the following website: https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-cohesion-and-cohesive-devices-in-writing or in the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pt1q2RZ_n9Q

The comprehension text for this week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please support your child to complete the Word meaning, summary and language questions on pages 20-21 of their non-fiction comprehension workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class on Wednesday.

In maths, we will be returning to the concept of division. We will be using a written method of division to divide by two-digit numbers. We will also be consolidating the order of operations (BODMAS).

There is a helpful explanation on BBC bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z69k7ty/articles/z24ctv4

You can support your child’s learning by exploring relevant questions on pages 13, 14, 15 and 15 in their Maths Workbook. (They do not have to complete all of these, just select examples they wish to try.)

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.

 


Year 6 Preview Learning: 5th October 2020

This week in English, we will be beginning our unit on biographies, discovering the features of biographical texts and researching influential local figures.  

  • Our spellings for the week are hyphenated prefix words:
  • co-operate,
  • co-ordinate,
  • co-own,
  • co-author,
  • re-enter,
  • re-educate,
  • re-examine,
  • re-evaluate,
  • re-energise,
  • re-elect.

In grammar, we will be revising apostrophes for possession (with plurals) and contraction. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Apostrophes and plurals A and B’ or watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNFPnVz7JB4

The comprehension text for this week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please support your child to complete the inference questions Pages on pages 18-19 of their non-fiction comprehension workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class on Wednesday.

 

In maths, we will be revising multiplication.  We will be reminding ourselves of the terms: square numbers, cube numbers, factors, multiples and primes. We will also be consolidating formal long multiplication up to 4 digits by 2 digits. You can support your child’s learning by exploring relevant questions on pages 9, 10, 11 and 12 in their Maths Workbook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You could also see BBC bitesize for a reminder, if needed: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z4chnrd#:~:text=To%20do%20long%20multiplication%20you,together%20to%20get%20the%20answer.

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.

 


Year 6 Preview Learning: 28th September 2020

This week in English, we will be continuing our work on narratives with flashbacks by writing in response

to scenes from ‘Toy Story 2’ and ‘Up.’

We will also be publishing our favourite narrative so far into our Star Write books.

 

Our spellings for the week are changing –ent adjectives into –ence, -ency nouns: innocent, innocence, decent, decency, excellent, excellence, confident, confidence, existent, existence.

In grammar, we will be revising direct speech punctuation.

You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Direct speech punctuation A and B.’

(Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

 

The comprehension text for this week will be: ‘The Problem with Plastic.’ Please support your child to complete the fact retrieval questions on pages 16-17 of their non-fiction comprehension workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class on Wednesday.

In maths, we will be revising column method for subtraction. Ask your child about ‘knocking on the door’ and ‘borrowing.’ They may need help with borrowing across zeros. Try the column method with numbers up to 7 digits and with decimal numbers.

You can support your child’s learning by exploring the relevant questions on pages 7 and 8 in their Maths Workbook.

 

Please can you also bring into school a plastic bottle (about 500ml) for us to use in our art work.  This bottle will be transformed into something exciting – so will not be able to be returned to you. Thank you! Here’s a clue!

 

 

 

 

Many thanks for your continued support, Mrs Field.


Year 6 Preview Learning: 21st September 2020

This week in English, we will be completing our narrative with a time slip or a flashback. We will then be editing our work against our toolkit.

We will also be introducing a new visual text, ‘The Piano’ by Aidan Gibbons.

Our spellings for the week turn –ant adjectives into –ancy/-ance nouns: observant, observance, expectant, expectancy, hesitant, hesitancy, tolerant, tolerance, relevant, relevance.
In grammar, we will be revising relative clauses. A relative clause can be used to give additional information about a noun. T

hey are introduced by a relative pronoun like ‘that’, ‘which’, ‘who’, ‘whose’, ‘where’ and ‘when’. For example: I won’t stand by the man who smells of slime. In this example, the relative clause is ‘who smells of slime’. It provides more information about the man. The relative pronoun, ‘who’, is used to connect these clauses in the sentence. You may find it helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘relative clauses,’ or look at BBC bitesize.
(https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zsrt4qt)
(Google is also always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

The comprehension text for this week will once again be: ‘The Angel of the North.’ Please support your child to complete the word meaning questions, summary questions and prediction question on pages 10-11 of their non-fiction workbook. We will then discuss the answers in class on Wednesday.

In maths, we will be revising addition, using mental methods and consolidating the column method. You can support your child’s learning by exploring relevant questions on pages 5 and 6 in their Maths Workbook.

Many thanks for your continued support,
Mrs Field.


Year 6 Preview Learning: 14th September 2020

This week in English, we will be continuing our narrative with a time slip or a flashback. We will be editing for cohesion, clarity and extended punctuation.

Our spellings for the week are homophones: (words which sound the same or similar but are spelt differently): advice, advise, device, devise, licence, license, practice, practise, prophecy and prophesy. It will be useful to place these into a relevant sentence.

In grammar, we will be revising main and subordinate clauses. It may be helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt ‘Subordinate clauses and conjunctions A.’ (Google is always very useful for grammar definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

The comprehension text for the week will be continuing: ‘The Angel of the North.’ Please support your child to complete the inference questions on pages 8-9 of their non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class.

In maths, we will be continuing to round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy e.g. to the nearest 10, 100, 1000.

We will also explore the use of negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero. You can support your child’s learning by exploring pages 1 and 2 in their Maths Workbook.

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field.

 


Year 6 Preview Learning: 7th September 2020

This week in English, we will be introducing a narrative with a time slip or a flashback. We will be creating a text map and discovering the key features and patterns of language in a ‘time slip’ text.

Our spellings for the week are ambitious synonyms: (adjectives with a similar meaning) aggressive, hostile, awkward, obstinate, desperate, frantic, disastrous, calamitous, marvellous and spectacular.

In grammar, we will be revising grammar vocabulary from previous years, classifying: nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, determiners and articles. It may be helpful to login to SPAG.com and attempt Terminology Year 5 A and B. (Google is always very useful for definitions and reminders, as is: https://home.oxfordowl.co.uk/english/primary-grammar/grammar-year-6-age-10-11/.)

The comprehension text for the week will be: ‘The Angel of the North.’ Please support your child to complete fact retrieval questions on pages 6-7 of their non-fiction workbook, we will then discuss the possible answers in class.

In maths, we will be learning to: read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit.

We will also be beginning to round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy e.g. to the nearest 10, 100, 1000. You can support your child’s learning by looking at pages 1, 3 and 5 in their Maths Workbook.

Many thanks for your continued support,

Mrs Field.